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    Wang, Yue-Qiao Zhang, Yun-Quan Zhang, Fei Zhang, Yi-Wen Li, Rui and Chen, Guo-Xun 2016. Increased Eating Frequency Is Associated with Lower Obesity Risk, But Higher Energy Intake in Adults: A Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 13, Issue. 6, p. 603.


    Leidy, Heather J. Tang, Minghua Armstrong, Cheryl L.H. Martin, Carmen B. and Campbell, Wayne W. 2011. The Effects of Consuming Frequent, Higher Protein Meals on Appetite and Satiety During Weight Loss in Overweight/Obese Men. Obesity, Vol. 19, Issue. 4, p. 818.


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Increased meal frequency does not promote greater weight loss in subjects who were prescribed an 8-week equi-energetic energy-restricted diet

  • Jameason D. Cameron (a1), Marie-Josée Cyr (a1) and Éric Doucet (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114509992984
  • Published online: 30 November 2009
Abstract

There have been reports of an inverse relationship between meal frequency (MF) and adiposity. It has been postulated that this may be explained by favourable effects of increased MF on appetite control and possibly on gut peptides as well. The main goal of the present study was to investigate whether using a high MF could lead to a greater weight loss than that obtained with a low MF under conditions of similar energy restriction. Subjects were randomised into two treatment arms (high MF = 3 meals+3 snacks/d or low MF = 3 meals/d) and subjected to the same dietary energy restriction of − 2931 kJ/d for 8 weeks. Sixteen obese adults (n 8 women and 8 men; age 34·6 (sd 9·5); BMI 37·1 (sd 4·5) kg/m2) completed the study. Overall, there was a 4·7 % decrease in body weight (P < 0·01); similarly, significant decreases were noted in fat mass ( − 3·1 (sd 2·9) kg; P < 0·01), lean body mass ( − 2·0 (sd 3·1) kg; P < 0·05) and BMI ( − 1·7 (sd 0·8) kg/m2; P < 0·01). However, there were NS differences between the low- and high-MF groups for adiposity indices, appetite measurements or gut peptides (peptide YY and ghrelin) either before or after the intervention. We conclude that increasing MF does not promote greater body weight loss under the conditions described in the present study.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Éric Doucet, fax +1 613 562 5291, email eric.doucet@uottawa.ca
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5JB Ruidavets , V Bongard , V Bataille , (2002) Eating frequency and body fatness in middle-aged men. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 26, 14761483.

7SE Drummond , NE Crombie , MC Cursiter , (1998) Evidence that eating frequency is inversely related to body weight status in male, but not female, non-obese adults reporting valid dietary intakes. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 22, 105112.

9H Crawley & C Summerbell (1997) Feeding frequency and BMI among teenagers aged 16–17 years. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 21, 159161.

13DP Speechly , GG Rogers & R Buffenstein (1999) Acute appetite reduction associated with an increased frequency of eating in obese males. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 23, 11511159.

15E Doucet , P Imbeault , S St-Pierre , (2000) Appetite after weight loss by energy restriction and a low-fat diet-exercise follow-up. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 24, 906914.

16E Doucet , M Laviolette , P Imbeault , (2008) Total peptide YY is a correlate of postprandial energy expenditure but not of appetite or energy intake in healthy women. Metabolism 57, 14581464.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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