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Testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, calculated free testosterone, and oestradiol in male vegans and omnivores

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Timothy J. A. Key
Affiliation:
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Gibson Building, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE
Liane Roe
Affiliation:
General Practice Research Group, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Department of Community Medicine & General Practice, Gibson Building, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE
Margaret Thorogood
Affiliation:
General Practice Research Group, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Department of Community Medicine & General Practice, Gibson Building, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE
John W. Moore
Affiliation:
Clinical Endocrinology Laboratory, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, PO Box 123, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX
Graham M. G. Clark
Affiliation:
Clinical Endocrinology Laboratory, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, PO Box 123, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX
Dennis Y. Wang
Affiliation:
Clinical Endocrinology Laboratory, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, PO Box 123, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX
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Abstract

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Total testosterone (T), total oestradiol (E2) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations were measured in plasma samples from fifty-one male vegans and fifty-seven omnivores of similar age. Free T concentration was estimated by calculation, in comparison with the omnivores, the vegans had 7% higher total T (P = 0.250), 23% higher SHBG (P = 0.001), 3% lower free T (P = 0.580), and 11% higher E2 (P = 0.194). In a subset of eighteen vegans and twenty-two omnivores for whom 4 d diet records were available, there were statistically significant correlations between T and polyunsaturated fatty acids (r 0.37), SHBG and fat (r 0.43 for total fat, 0.46 for saturated fatty acids and 0.33 for polyunsaturated fatty acids), and SHBG and alcohol (r–0.39). It is concluded that a vegan diet causes a substantial increase in SHBG but has little effect on total or free T or on E2.

Type
Hormones and Metabolism
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1990

References

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