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Western dietary pattern is related to premenstrual syndrome: a case–control study

  • Negin Farasati (a1), Fereydoun Siassi (a1), Fariba Koohdani (a2), Mostafa Qorbani (a3) (a4), Karolin Abashzadeh (a1) and Gity Sotoudeh (a1)...

Abstract

Although premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects a large number of women of reproductive age, the aetiology of this disorder has not yet been fully elucidated. The relationship between food intake and PMS morbidity has been investigated in several studies, but dietary patterns of PMS patients have not been taken into consideration up to now. We examined dietary patterns of 320 nurses with (n 160) and without (n 160) PMS in a case–control study. Food intakes over the past year were determined using semi-quantitative FFQ. Factor analysis was used to identify the main dietary patterns, and logistic regression was used to model the relationship between dietary patterns and PMS morbidity. Three dietary patterns were identified in the analysis: healthy, Western and traditional. After adjustment for age, BMI, menstrual cycles, physical activity and energy intake, participants in the second (OR 2·53; 95 % CI 1·18, 5·43) and third (OR 4·39; 95 % CI 1·97, 9·81) quintiles of the Western dietary pattern were more likely to experience PMS compared with those in the first quintile. The study findings therefore reveal that Western dietary pattern might be associated with PMS morbidity. However, this result should be interpreted with caution as there was no evidence of a dose–response relationship. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings in other populations.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding authors: G. Sotoudeh, fax +98 21 88974462, email gsotodeh@tums.ac.ir; F. Siassi, fax +98 21 88974462, email siassif@tums.ac.ir

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Keywords

Western dietary pattern is related to premenstrual syndrome: a case–control study

  • Negin Farasati (a1), Fereydoun Siassi (a1), Fariba Koohdani (a2), Mostafa Qorbani (a3) (a4), Karolin Abashzadeh (a1) and Gity Sotoudeh (a1)...

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