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Zinc supplementation and inflammatory cytokines

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2021

Alireza Jafari
Affiliation:
Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Science and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Saeed Ghobadi*
Affiliation:
Non-Communicable Diseases Research Center, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran
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Abstract

Type
Letter to the Editor
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

We read with interest the article of Faghfouri et al. (Reference Faghfouri, Baradaran and Khabbazi1) regarding the ‘Profiling Inflammatory Cytokines Following Zinc Supplementation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials’ and we would like to point out three concerns regarding the study selection presented in this article. First, although the authors searched electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Embase), three eligible studies were ignored(Reference Ahmad and Al-Ahmare2Reference Rahfiludin, Wirjatmadi and Agusni4). Second, the authors mentioned that non-randomised design studies and also articles conducted on juvenile subjects (10–19 years)(5) were excluded; however, two articles were included in the analysis(Reference Beserra de Moura, Mello Soares and de Lima Barros6,Reference Kara, Ozal and Gunay7) . Third, another article was carried out on pregnant women(Reference Roshanravan, Tarighat-Esfanjani and Alamdari8), which should be excluded from analysis because the condition of inflammatory cytokines and also the effect of supplementation on pregnant women are relatively different from non-pregnant adults. In view of the deficiencies mentioned above, it is suggested that the analysis should be repeated.

References

Faghfouri, AH, Baradaran, B, Khabbazi, A, et al. (2021) Profiling inflammatory cytokines following zinc supplementation: a systematic review, meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Br J Nutr 1–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ahmad, I & Al-Ahmare, K (2016) Effect of Vitamin A and zinc on circulating profile of IL-2, IL-12, and IFNγ cytokines in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Int J Nutr Pharmacol Neurol Dis 6, 6371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guo, C-H & Wang, C-L (2013) Effects of zinc supplementation on plasma copper/zinc ratios, oxidative stress, and immunological status in hemodialysis patients. Int J Med Sci 10, 7989.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rahfiludin, MZ, Wirjatmadi, B, Agusni, I, et al. (2011) Zinc supplementation could modulate T cell to maintain interleukin-2 level in seropositive contact of leprosy patients. Med J Indonesia 20, 201204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Organization WH (2015) Adolescent Health in the South-East Asia Region. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar
Beserra de Moura, MS, Mello Soares, NR, de Lima Barros, SE, et al. (2020) Zinc gluconate supplementation impacts the clinical improvement in patients with ulcerative colitis. Biometals 33, 1527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kara, E, Ozal, M, Gunay, M, et al. (2011) Effects of exercise, zinc supplementation on cytokine release in young wrestlers. Biol Trace Elem Res 143, 14351440.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roshanravan, N, Tarighat-Esfanjani, A, Alamdari, NM, et al. (2018) The effects of zinc supplementation on inflammatory parameters in pregnant women with impaired glucose tolerance: a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial. Progr Nutr 20, 330336.Google Scholar
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