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Asylum-Seekers Have Human Rights, Too

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2003

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Extract

There can be few minoritieswith the possible exception of those who are suspected of involvement in international terrorism, whose due process rights are currently suspended under Part IV of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001who suffer greater unpopularity than asylum-seekers. Yet these are the very groups for whom enforceable human rights are most essential, in order that they may protect themselves against the tyranny of the majorityand of its elected representatives. This proposition is vividly illustrated by the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002, section 55(1) of which provides that the Secretary of State “may not provide or arrange for the provision of support such as food and shelter for asylum-seekers if he is “not satisfied that the claim was made as soon as reasonably practicable after the person's arrival in the United Kingdom”.

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Case and Comment
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge Law Journal and Contributors 2003

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