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PREDATORY ARTHROPODS IN HIGH- AND LOW-MAINTENANCE TURFGRASS1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Stephen D. Cockfield
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40546–0091
Daniel A. Potter
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40546–0091

Abstract

Predatory arthropods were sampled in high-maintenance Kentucky bluegrass lawns (lawns under commercial lawn care), low-maintenance Kentucky bluegrass lawns (under minimal care), and low-maintenance tall-fescue lawns. In general, tall fescue supported fewer predators than Kentucky bluegrass, specifically the families Erigon-idae, Linyphiidae, and Carabidae. Populations of Erigonidae, Linyphiidae, and Carabidae were lower in high-maintenance bluegrass than in low-maintenance bluegrass. The carabids Amara cupreolata Putzeys, Agonum punctiformum (Say), and Harpalus (Pseudopkonus) spp., and a staphylinid, Philonthus sp., were particularly uncommon in high-maintenance sites. Hierarchical classification of sites suggested that the structure of the staphylinid and carabid communities differs in tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass turf, and differs in high- and low-maintenance bluegrass.

Résumé

Des échantillons d'arthropodes prédateurs ont été prélevés dans des pelouses d'herbe bleue du Kentucky hautement entretenues (entretien commercial), des pelouses d'herbe bleue du Kentucky faiblement entretenues (entretien minime) et des pelouses de fétuque faiblement entretenues. En général, les pelouses de fétuque entretenaient moins de prédateurs que l'herbe bleue du Kentucky, particulièrement de prédateurs appartenant aux familles Erigonidae, Linyphiidae et de Carabidae. Les populations d'Erigonidae, Linyphiidae et de Carabidae étaient plus faibles dans l'herbe bleue hautement entretenue que dans l'herbe bleue peu entretenue. Les carabides des espèces Amara cupreolata Putzeys, Agonum punctiformum (Say) et Harpalus (Pseudophonus) et un staphylinide, l'espèce Philonthus étaient particulièrement rares dans les sites hautement entretenus. La classification hiérarchique des sites suggère que la structure des populations de staphylinides et carabides diffère selon qu'elles se trouvent dans des pelouses de fétuque ou d'herbe bleue et également dans de l'herbe bleue hautement ou faiblement entretenue.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1985

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PREDATORY ARTHROPODS IN HIGH- AND LOW-MAINTENANCE TURFGRASS1
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