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Coaching in emergency medicine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2015

Constance LeBlanc*
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS
Jonathan Sherbino
Affiliation:
Division of Emergency Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
*
Department of Emergency Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax Infirmary, Ste. 355, 1796 Summer St., Halifax NS B3H 3A7; Constance.LeBlanc@dal.ca

Abstract

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Type
Education • Enseignement
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2010

References

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