Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Intellectual, Institutional, and Technological Transitions: Central European History, 2004–2014

  • Kenneth F. Ledford (a1)
Extract

Volumes 38 to 47 of Central European History, which appeared from July 2004 to June 2014, represented years of fundamental transition in the life of the journal and of its sponsoring society: then the Conference Group for Central European History, now the Central European History Society. This fundamental transition manifested itself in three forms: institutional formality, both of the journal and of the Conference Group/Society; publishing organization and technology—from the ways in which the editor produced the journal to the ways in which the audience consumed the scholarship it published; and, last but not least, the intellectual focus and content of the history of German-speaking Central Europe that Central European History presented to scholars and students alike. Although the decade presented some unexpected and surprising challenges, all these transitions were already visible in July 2002 when I presented my proposal to become editor of Central European History to the Editor Search Committee, which consisted of Konrad Jarausch, Kees Gispen, and then-editor Kenneth Barkin.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Intellectual, Institutional, and Technological Transitions: Central European History, 2004–2014
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Intellectual, Institutional, and Technological Transitions: Central European History, 2004–2014
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Intellectual, Institutional, and Technological Transitions: Central European History, 2004–2014
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All

1 The leadership concluded that the Conference Group for Central European History was a confusing name, which led to the formal change in January 2012. After all, the primary task of the Conference Group was to publish the journal—it held no “conference,” despite its name! The thought was that the name “Central European History Society” led with the “brand” that was best known—i.e., the journal—and that it was simpler and less of a mouthful.

2 Van Tassel, David D., “From Learned Society to Professional Organization: The American Historical Association 1884–1900,” American Historical Review 89 no. 4 (1984): 940–41.

3 News from the United States—The Journal of Central European Affairs,” Austrian History Yearbook 1 (1965): 294–95; From the Editors” [Unfug, Douglas A.], Central European History (CEH) 1, no. 1 (1968): 3. The latter is reprinted in full in this commemorative issue.

4 I note with some chagrin that, until the end of my term in 2014, the back matter of Central European History expressed a willingness to accept print submissions, preserving until that late date the antiquated language that “manuscripts submitted in printed form must be accompanied by a compact disk or diskette with the article in Word, WordPerfect, or pdf”! I do not recall having received a single submission in print through the mail at any time after 2005.

5 Brill had licensed the backlist for volumes 7 to 38 of Central European History to EBSCO Host, without consulting the editor or the Conference Group; those volumes became available in Academic Search Premier.

6 On the emergence of library consortia, see Bostick, Sharon L., “Academic Library Consortia in the United States: An Introduction,” Liber Quarterly 11, no. 1 (2001): 613.

7 Blackbourn, David, “Honey, I Shrunk German History,” German Studies Association Newsletter 38, no. 2 (2013–2014): 4453; Epstein, Catherine, “German Historians at the Back of the Pack: Hiring Patterns in Modern European History, 1945–2010,” CEH 46, no. 3 (2013): 599639; Port, Andrew I., “Central European History since 1989: Historiographical Trends and Post-Wende ‘Turns,’CEH 48, no. 2 (2015): 238–48.

8 For an insightful exploration of the long history of the contestation of the boundaries of “Central Europe,” see Okey, Robin, “Central Europe/Eastern Europe: Behind the Definitions,” Past & Present 137, no. 1 (1992): 102–33. See also Timothy Garton Ash, “The Puzzle of Central Europe,” New York Review of Books, March 18, 1999.

9 Port, “Central European History since 1989,” 246–47.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Central European History
  • ISSN: 0008-9389
  • EISSN: 1569-1616
  • URL: /core/journals/central-european-history
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 9
Total number of PDF views: 79 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 126 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 28th March 2018 - 23rd September 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.