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A Systematic Map of Non-Clinical Evidence Syntheses Published Globally on COVID-19

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2021

Umair Majid*
Affiliation:
Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Syed Ahmed Shahzaeem Hussain
Affiliation:
Allama Iqbal Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan
Aghna Wasim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nusrat Farhana
Affiliation:
Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Pakeezah Saadat
Affiliation:
Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Applied Health Research Centre (AHRC), Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
*
Corresponding author: Umair Majid, Email: majidua@mcmaster.ca.

Abstract

Study objective:

Evidence syntheses perform rigorous investigations of the primary literature and they have played a vital role in generating evidence-based recommendations for governments worldwide during the Covid-19 pandemic. However, there has not yet been an attempt to organize them by topic and other characteristics. This study performed a systematic mapping exercise of non-clinical evidence syntheses pertaining to Covid-19.

Methods:

This study conducted a systematic search on December 5, 2020 across 10 databases and servers: CINAHL (EBSCO Information Services, Ipswich, Massachusetts, United States), Embase (Elsevier, Aalborg, Denmark), Global Health (EBSCO Information Services, Ipswich, Massachusetts, United States), Healthstar (NICHSR and AHA, Bethesda, United States), MEDLINE (NLM, Bethesda, United States), PsychINFO (APA, Washington, DC, United States), Web of Science (Clarivate Analytics, London, UK), Research Square (Research Square, Durham, North Carolina), MEDRxiv (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York, United States), and PROSPERO (NIHR, York, United Kingdom). Only full evidence syntheses published in a peer-reviewed journal or preprint server were included.

Results:

This study classified all evidence syntheses in the following topics: health service delivery (n = 280), prevention and behavior (n = 201), mental health (n = 140), social epidemiology (n = 31), economy (n = 22), and environment (n = 19). This study provides a comprehensive resource of all evidence syntheses categorized according to topic.

Conclusions:

This study proposes the following research priorities: governance, the impact of Covid-19 on different populations, the effectiveness of prevention and control methods across contexts, mental health, and vaccine hesitancy.

Type
Systematic Review
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc

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