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Futuristic First Responders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2016

Zion Tsz Ho Tse
Affiliation:
Medical Robotics Laboratory, College of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
Sierra Hovet
Affiliation:
Medical Robotics Laboratory, College of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
Chi-Ngai Cheung
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Isaac Chun-Hai Fung
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia.
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Type
Letters to the Editor
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2016 

The ultimate sacrifice of 104 firefighters at the August 12, 2015, Tianjin explosions and the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina call for the development of rescue robots as first responders. 1 , Reference Boyette 2 Robots can be designed to combat fires, contain chemicals, rescue citizens, and perform other dangerous tasks. During disasters, the appropriate use of rescue robots could save lives.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robotics Challenge (DRC) is an international competition that encourages the development of robots for performing rescue tasks in disaster zones. Some key elements of rescue robots that need further improvement are the ability to act autonomously, the mode and reliability of remote operation, the limitations of power cords, the ability to get in and out of vehicles, and dexterity that does not compromise robustness, strength, mobility, and balance.Reference Rosen 3

Because disaster relief tasks require operating equipment and maneuvering in buildings designed for humans, most rescue robots have human-like outlook and functionalities. Atlas is a DARPA-funded project to develop humanoid robots to serve in combat fields and operate in tough terrain with minimal guidance from remote human operators.Reference Feng, Xinjilefu, Atkeson and Kim 4 SAFFiR,Reference Kim and Lattimer 5 a humanoid robot that functions as a firefighter, can operate fire-suppressing equipment, see through smoke, and navigate passageways, ladders, and hatches of a ship even when the ocean is rough. The remote control and communication capability of rescue robots ensure the safety of human operators and open the possibility of crowdsourcing—an effort employed in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

Existing robot technology is promising for disaster relief. Collaboration between researchers and the industry could bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical side of rescue robot technology, lending to designs optimized for manufacturing and cost-effectiveness. Robotic responders with the required qualities to operate in disaster environments will provide invaluable assistance to rescue efforts.

Acknowledgment

ICHF receives salary support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (15IPA1509134). This letter is not related to ICHF’s CDC-supported research.

Disclaimer

The CDC had no role in the writing, submission, or publication of this letter. This letter does not represent the official positions of the CDC or the US Government.

References

1. Associated Press in Beijing. Tianjin explosion: China sets final death toll at 173, ending search for survivors. The Guardian (London). http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/sep/12/tianjin-explosion-china-sets-final-death-toll-at-173-ending-search-for-survivors. Published September 12, 2015. Accessed February 10, 2016.Google Scholar
2. Boyette, C. Robots, drones and heart-detectors: how disaster technology is saving lives. CNN website. http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/24/us/robot-disaster-technology/. Published October 5, 2015. Accessed August 25, 2015.Google Scholar
3. Rosen, M. Robots to the rescue: DARPA’s robotics challenge inspires new disaster-relief technology. Science News. 2014;186(12):16-20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Feng, S, Xinjilefu, X, Atkeson, C, Kim, J. Optimization based controller design and implementation for the Atlas robot in the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals. Preprint submitted to 2015 IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, July 7, 2015. Carnegie Mellon University, School of Computer Science website. http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~cga/drc/ICHR15_0025_MS.pdf. Accessed September 5, 2015.Google Scholar
5. Kim, JH, Lattimer, BY. Real-time probabilistic classification of fire and smoke using thermal imagery for intelligent firefighting robot. Fire Safety Journal. 2015;72:40-49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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