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RACE AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTAL RISK: A Case Example from the Detroit Metropolitan Area

  • Amy J. Schulz (a1), Graciela B. Mentz (a2), Natalie Sampson (a3), Melanie Ward (a4), Rhonda Anderson (a5), Ricardo de Majo (a6), Barbara A. Israel (a7), Toby C. Lewis (a8) and Donele Wilkins (a9)...
Abstract
Abstract

Since W. E. B. Du Bois documented the physical and social environments of Philadelphia’s predominantly African American Seventh Ward over a century ago, there has been continued interest in understanding the distribution of social and physical environments by racial make-up of communities. Characterization of these environments allows for documentation of inequities, identifies communities which encounter heightened risk, and can inform action to promote health equity. In this paper, we apply and extend Du Bois’s approach to examine the contemporary distribution of physical environmental exposures, health risks, and social vulnerabilities in the Detroit metropolitan area, one of the most racially-segregated areas in the United States. We begin by mapping the proximity of sensitive populations to hazardous land uses, their exposure to air pollutants and associated health risks, and social vulnerabilities, as well as cumulative risk (combined proximity, exposure, and vulnerability), across Census tracts. Next, we assess, quantitatively, the extent to which communities of color experience excess burdens of environmental exposures and associated health risks, economic and age-related vulnerabilities, and cumulative risk. The results, depicted in maps presented in the paper, suggest that Census tracts with greater proportions of people of color disproportionately encounter physical environmental exposures, socioeconomic vulnerabilities, and combined risk. Quantitative tests of inequality confirm these distributions, with statistically greater exposures, vulnerabilities, and cumulative risk in Census tracts with larger proportions of people of color. Together, these findings identify communities that experience disproportionate cumulative risk in the Detroit metropolitan area and quantify the inequitable distribution of risk by Census tract relative to the proportion of people of color. They identify clear opportunities for prioritizing communities for legislative, regulatory, policy, and local actions to promote environmental justice and health equity.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Professor Amy J. Schulz, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029. E-mail: ajschulz@umich.edu
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Neal Fann , Amy D. Lamson , Susan C. Anenberg , Karen Wesson , David Risley , and Bryan J. Hubbell (2012). Estimating the National Public Health Burden Associated with Exposure to Ambient PM2.5 and Ozone. Risk Anal, 32(1): 8195.

Anna Makri , and Nikolaos I. Stilianakis (2008). Vulnerability to Air Pollution Health Effects. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 211(3-4): 326336.

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Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
  • ISSN: 1742-058X
  • EISSN: 1742-0598
  • URL: /core/journals/du-bois-review-social-science-research-on-race
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