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    Kung, Fan-Wei 2015. Reexamining the NS and NNS Dichotomy in Taiwanese Higher EFL Education. The Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, Vol. 24, Issue. 1, p. 27.


    Prćić, Tvrtko 2014. Building contact linguistic competence related to English as the nativized foreign language. System, Vol. 42, p. 143.


    Jenks, Christopher 2013. ‘Your pronunciation and your accent is very excellent’: orientations of identity during compliment sequences in English as a lingua franca encounters. Language and Intercultural Communication, Vol. 13, Issue. 2, p. 165.


    Rajagopalan, Kanavillil 2012. ‘World English’ or ‘World Englishes’? Does it make any difference?. International Journal of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 22, Issue. 3, p. 374.


    Watterson, Matthew 2011. Revisiting CEWIGs: A reflection on the usage of collocations of ‘English’ with ‘world’, ‘international’ and ‘global’. English Today, Vol. 27, Issue. 01, p. 42.


    SEARGEANT, PHILIP 2010. Naming and defining in world Englishes. World Englishes, Vol. 29, Issue. 1, p. 97.


    SEARGEANT, PHILIP 2008. Language, ideology and ‘English within a globalized context’. World Englishes, Vol. 27, Issue. 2, p. 217.


    Pickering, Lucy 2006. CURRENT RESEARCH ON INTELLIGIBILITY IN ENGLISH AS A LINGUA FRANCA. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 26,


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The many names of English

  • ELIZABETH J. ERLING (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0266078405001094
  • Published online: 01 January 2005
Abstract

A discussion of the variety of labels given to the language in its worldwide role. In his article ‘Is it world or international or global English, and does it matter?’ (ET79, Jul 04), Tom McArthur welcomes further comment on the names of English in a ‘globalizing world’. He examines the histories and meanings of the three most popular labels for English: world, international and global. In addition to discussing his contribution, I would like to draw attention to other, perhaps less familiar names for English that have been proposed as alternatives. This paper seeks both to survey these labels and uncover why there is such a strong compulsion to rename the language. I suggest that these proposals have arisen in response to postcolonial ambiguity about the spread of English and a desire to shape a new ideology for English language teaching (ELT) which more accurately reflects the global nature of the language and its diverse uses and users.

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English Today
  • ISSN: 0266-0784
  • EISSN: 1474-0567
  • URL: /core/journals/english-today
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