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Acceptability of community quarantine in contexts of communicable disease epidemics: perspectives of literate lay people living in Conakry, Guinea

  • Lonzozou Kpanake (a1), Jean-Pierre Leno (a2), Paul Clay Sorum (a3) and Etienne Mullet (a4)

Abstract

During the 2014–2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, some communities reacted hostilely to the implementation of quarantine measures. This study's aim was to examine the views of lay people in Guinea on the acceptability of community quarantine. From June to August 2016, 302 adults indicated the acceptability of quarantine in 36 scenarios varying as a function of four factors: the infectious disease's level of contagiousness, its level of lethality, the number of cases in the community and whether persons in quarantine are provided with support services. Five clusters were identified: (1) for 18% of the participants, quarantine is never acceptable; (2) 16% considered, in contrast, that quarantine is always acceptable; (3) for 14%, it depends on the disease's level of contagiousness and lethality; (4) 36% based their judgement not only on the levels of contagiousness and lethality, but also on whether those in quarantine are provided with support services; and (5) 16% had no opinion. Interventions to increase voluntary compliance with community quarantine in Guinea must not be ‘one size fits all’, but must be multifaceted and tailored in design and implementation to match the diversity of people's concerns and needs.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Lonzozou Kpanake, E-mail: lonzozou.kpanake@teluq.ca

References

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Acceptability of community quarantine in contexts of communicable disease epidemics: perspectives of literate lay people living in Conakry, Guinea

  • Lonzozou Kpanake (a1), Jean-Pierre Leno (a2), Paul Clay Sorum (a3) and Etienne Mullet (a4)

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