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Epidemiology of pericardial effusions at a large academic hospital in South Africa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 January 2005

H. REUTER
Affiliation:
Cardiology Unit/TREAD Research, Tygerberg Hospital and Stellenbosch University, South Africa
L. J. BURGESS
Affiliation:
Cardiology Unit/TREAD Research, Tygerberg Hospital and Stellenbosch University, South Africa
A. F. DOUBELL
Affiliation:
Cardiology Unit/TREAD Research, Tygerberg Hospital and Stellenbosch University, South Africa
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Abstract

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The aim was to establish the prevalence of large pericardial effusions in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and to determine the incidence of various types of effusions. A total of 233 patients presented with large pericardial effusions. Each patient underwent tests for HIV, sputum smear and culture, blood culture, blood biochemistry and serological testing. Tuberculous pericardial effusions were diagnosed according to pre-determined criteria. Eighty-four patients (36·1%) were found to be HIV positive; 81 of these (96·4%) had tuberculous pericarditis. More than 65% of the study population was aged between 15 and 39 years. The prevalence of HIV amongst unemployed individuals was 49·0% compared to 30·0% amongst employed individuals. Tuberculous pericarditis was the most common cause of pericardial effusions (69·5%, n=162). It was concluded that tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of pericarditis in this province of South Africa. The prevalence of TB confounded by HIV co-infection is steadily increasing, burdening the health-care facilities.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press
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