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Evaluation of the representativeness of a sentinel surveillance site for campylobacteriosis

  • C. F. BOLWELL (a1), B. J. GILPIN (a2), D. CAMPBELL (a3) and N. P. FRENCH (a1)
Summary

It is important to assess the suitability of sentinel sites for human disease; however, there have been few publications documenting the process of formal evaluation. We describe an approach to examining the representativeness of a single sentinel site employed for campylobacteriosis surveillance and source attribution, utilizing a selection of data sources and statistical comparisons of demographic, epidemiological and pathogen genotyping data across selected regions of New Zealand. Our findings showed that while this region captured the national variability in many variables, for example by containing sizable urban and rural populations, the relative frequency of these features did vary from other regions of New Zealand. We discuss the value of choosing a sentinel site that represents the national distribution of key variables, compared to a site that captures the broad features of the wider population, but provides greater power for the monitoring of sub-populations.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
* Author for correspondence: Miss C. F. Bolwell, Molecular Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory, Infectious Disease Research Centre, Hopkirk Research Institute, Massey University, Private Bag, 11 222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand. (Email: c.bolwell@massey.ac.nz)
References
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Epidemiology & Infection
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