Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Incidence of hospitalization due to community-acquired rotavirus infection: a 12-year study (1996–2008)

  • G. CILLA (a1), M. GOMARIZ (a1), M. MONTES (a1), M. I. MENDIBURU (a2), E. G. PÉREZ-YARZA (a3) (a4) and E. PÉREZ-TRALLERO (a1) (a4)...

Summary

The incidence of hospitalization for acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a useful parameter to assess the utility of the new rotavirus vaccines in high-income countries. Children hospitalized for AGE were identified by searching hospital discharge data and the records of the microbiology laboratory of Hospital Donostia. Rotavirus antigen was investigated in 96·1% of the 1114 children aged 1 month to <5 years hospitalized for AGE in the study period. Nearly 40% were rotavirus positive (44·9% of the 798 children aged 1 month to <2 years), with G1[P8] being the predominant genotype. The mean annual incidence rate of hospitalization due to rotavirus AGE was 29·8 and 63·7 cases/10 000 inhabitants in the <5 and <2 years age groups, respectively, in 1996–1999, decreasing to 13·6 and 27·4 cases/10 000 inhabitants in <5 and <2 years age groups, respectively, in 2002–2005 (P<0·001). This decrease coincided with a significant increase in the consumption of oral rehydration solutions.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Incidence of hospitalization due to community-acquired rotavirus infection: a 12-year study (1996–2008)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Incidence of hospitalization due to community-acquired rotavirus infection: a 12-year study (1996–2008)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Incidence of hospitalization due to community-acquired rotavirus infection: a 12-year study (1996–2008)
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr G. Cilla, Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital Donostia, Paseo Dr. Beguiristain s/n, 20014 San Sebastián, Spain. (Email: carlosgustavo.cillaeguiluz@osakidetza.net)

References

Hide All
1.Parashar, UD, et al. Global illness and deaths caused by rotavirus disease in children. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2003; 9: 565572.
2.Williams, CJ, Lobanov, A, Pebody, RG. Estimated mortality and hospital admission due to rotavirus infection in the WHO European region. Epidemiology and Infection 2009; 137: 607616.
3.Ruiz-Palacios, GM, et al. Safety and efficacy of an attenuated vaccine against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. New England Journal of Medicine 2006; 354: 1122.
4.Vesikari, T, et al. Safety and efficacy of a pentavalent human-bovine (WC3) reassortant rotavirus vaccine. New England Journal of Medicine 2006; 354: 2333.
5.Patel, M, et al. Association between pentavalent rotavirus vaccine and severe rotavirus diarrhea among children in Nicaragua. Journal of the American Medical Association 2009; 301: 22432251.
6.Cilla, G, et al. Hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis in Gipuzkoa (Basque country), Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases 1999; 5: 834835.
7.Iturriza-Gomara, M, Kang, G, Gray, J. Rotavirus genotyping: keeping up with an evolving population of human rotaviruses. Journal of Clinical Virology 2004; 31: 259265.
8.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Rotavirus surveillance − worldwide, 2001–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2008; 57: 12551257.
9.Atchison, CJ, et al. Clinical laboratory practices for the detection of rotavirus in England and Wales: can surveillance based on routine laboratory testing data be used to evaluate the impact of vaccination? Eurosurveillance 2009; 14: pii:19217. (http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19217). Accessed 2 September 2009.
10.Patel, MM, et al. Routine laboratory testing data for surveillance of rotavirus hospitalizations to evaluate the impact of vaccination. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2007; 26: 914919.
11.Chang, HG, et al. Disease burden and risk factors for hospitalizations associated with rotavirus infection among children in New York State, 1989 through 2000. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2003; 22: 808814.
12.Payne, DC, et al. Active, population-based surveillance for severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in the United States. Pediatrics 2008; 122: 12351243.
13.Hsu, VP, et al. Use of active surveillance to validate international classification of diseases code estimates of rotavirus hospitalizations in children. Pediatrics 2005; 115: 7882.
14.Parashar, UD, et al. Rotavirus and severe childhood diarrhea. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2006; 12: 304306.
15.Forster, J, et al. Hospital-based surveillance to estimate the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis among European children younger than 5 years of age. Pediatrics 2009; 123: e393–400.
16.Pont, SJ, et al. Trends in healthcare usage attributable to diarrhea, 1995–2004. Journal of Pediatrics 2008; 153: 777782.
17.Martinot, A, et al. Improvement in the management of acute diarrhoea in France? Archives de Pediatrie 2007; 14 (Suppl. 3): S181–185.
18.Bellemare, S, et al. Oral rehydration versus intravenous therapy for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. BMC Medicine 2004; 2: 11 (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/2/11). Accessed 2 September 2009.
19.Velázquez, FR, et al. Rotavirus infections in infants as protection against subsequent infections. New England Journal of Medicine 1996; 335: 10221028.
20.Cilla, G, et al. Incidence, seasonality and serotypes of rotavirus in Gipuzkoa (Basque Country), Spain. A 14-year study. Epidemiology and Infection 2000; 125: 677683.
21.Santos, N, Hoshino, Y. Global distribution of rotavirus serotypes/genotypes and its implication for the development and implementation of an effective rotavirus vaccine. Reviews of Medical Virology 2005; 15: 2956.
22.Sánchez-Fauquier, A, et al. Human rotavirus G9 and G3 as major cause of diarrhea in hospitalized children, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2006; 12: 15361541.
23.Van Damme, P, et al. Multicenter prospective study of the burden of rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in Europe, 2004–2005: the REVEAL study. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2007; 195 (Suppl. 1): S4–16.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed