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International outbreak of multiple Salmonella serotype infections linked to sprouted chia seed powder – USA and Canada, 2013–2014

  • R. R. HARVEY (a1) (a2), K. E. HEIMAN MARSHALL (a3), L. BURNWORTH (a3), M. HAMEL (a4), J. TATARYN (a4), J. CUTLER (a4), K. MEGHNATH (a4), A. WELLMAN (a5), K. IRVIN (a5), L. ISAAC (a6), K. CHAU (a6), A. LOCAS (a6), J. KOHL (a7), P. A. HUTH (a8), D. NICHOLAS (a8), E. TRAPHAGEN (a9), K. SOTO (a10), L. MANK (a10), K. HOLMES-TALBOT (a10), M. NEEDHAM (a11), A. BARNES (a11), B. ADCOCK (a11), L. HONISH (a12), L. CHUI (a12), M. TAYLOR (a13), C. GAULIN (a14), S. BEKAL (a15), B. WARSHAWSKY (a16), L. HOBBS (a16), L. R. TSCHETTER (a17), A. SURIN (a3), S. LANCE (a5), M. E. WISE (a3), I. WILLIAMS (a3) and L. GIERALTOWSKI (a3)...

Summary

Salmonella is a leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness. We report the collaborative investigative efforts of US and Canadian public health officials during the 2013–2014 international outbreak of multiple Salmonella serotype infections linked to sprouted chia seed powder. The investigation included open-ended interviews of ill persons, traceback, product testing, facility inspections, and trace forward. Ninety-four persons infected with outbreak strains from 16 states and four provinces were identified; 21% were hospitalized and none died. Fifty-four (96%) of 56 persons who consumed chia seed powder, reported 13 different brands that traced back to a single Canadian firm, distributed by four US and eight Canadian companies. Laboratory testing yielded outbreak strains from leftover and intact product. Contaminated product was recalled. Although chia seed powder is a novel outbreak vehicle, sprouted seeds are recognized as an important cause of foodborne illness; firms should follow available guidance to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination during sprouting.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: R. R. Harvey, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. (Email: iez1@cdc.gov)

References

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