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The Public Health Laboratory Service national case-control study of primary indigenous sporadic cases of campylobacter infection

  • G. K. Adak (a1), J. M. Cowden (a1), S. Nicholas (a1) and H. S. Evans (a1)

Summary

The aetiology of sporadic campylobacter infection was investigated by means of a multicentre case-control study. During the course of the study 598 cases and their controls were interviewed.

Conditional logistic regressional analysis of the data collected showed that occupational exposure to raw meat (odds ratio [OR] 9·37; 95 % confidence intervals [CI] 2·03, 43·3), having a household with a pet with diarrhoea (OR 2·39; CI 1·09. 5·25), and ingesting untreated water from lakes, rivers and streams (OR 4·16; CI 1·45. 11·9) were significant independent risk factors for becoming ill with campylobacter. Handling any whole chicken in the domestic kitchen that had been bought raw with giblets, or eating any dish cooked from chicken of this type in the home (OR 0·41–0·44; CI 0·24, 0·79) and occupational contact with livestock or their faeces (OR 0·44; CI 0·21, 0·92) were significantly associated with a decrease in the risk of becoming ill with campylobacter.

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Copyright

References

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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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