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Putative household outbreaks of campylobacteriosis typically comprise single MLST genotypes

  • O. ROTARIU (a1), A. SMITH-PALMER (a2), J. COWDEN (a2), P. R. BESSELL (a3), G. T. INNOCENT (a4), S. W. J. REID (a3), L. MATTHEWS (a3), J. DALLAS (a5), I. D. OGDEN (a5), K. J. FORBES (a5) and N. J. C. STRACHAN (a1)...

Summary

During a 15-month period in Scotland a small but important number of human Campylobacter cases (3·2%) arose from 91 putative household outbreaks. Of the 26 outbreaks with known strain composition, 89% were composed of the same MLST which supports the potential use of MLST in public health epidemiology. The number of cases associated with household outbreaks is much larger than general outbreaks and there is some evidence to indicate that there may be secondary transmission, although this is relatively rare.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr N. J. C. Strachan, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, UK. (Email: n.strachan@abdn.ac.uk)

References

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