Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ssw5r Total loading time: 0.198 Render date: 2022-08-10T02:50:06.552Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Salmonella surveillance: a global survey of public health serotyping

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2002

H. HERIKSTAD
Affiliation:
Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Y. MOTARJEMI
Affiliation:
Division of Food Safety and Food Aid, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
R. V. TAUXE
Affiliation:
Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

To better understand the global epidemiology of salmonellosis and the national surveillance programmes used for salmonella infections in humans, we conducted a global survey of the 191 WHO Member States. We gathered information on the total number of salmonella isolates serotyped, and the 15 most commonly isolated serotypes from humans in 1990 and 1995. Of the 104 countries that responded, 76 (73.1%) conducted public health surveillance for salmonella and 69 of these (90.8%) conducted serotyping as part of the surveillance. Fifty-nine countries (56.7% of those responding) provided information about the most commonly isolated serotypes in 1995. Three serotypes, Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Typhi accounted for 76.1% of all isolates reported in 1995. One of these three was the most common serotype identified in 93.2% of countries reporting data for that year. In 1995, Enteritidis was the most frequently isolated serotype in 35 countries, followed by Typhi (12 countries) and Typhimurium (8 countries). The global pandemic of Salmonella Enteritidis continued to expand. The mean national proportion of all salmonella isolates that were Enteritidis increased globally from 25.6% in 1990 to 36.3% in 1995. Serotyping is a frequently used component of a public health response to the global challenge of salmonellosis. Support for serotyping as part of national salmonella surveillance, and for rapid international communication of the results via a new WHO electronic website will help target future prevention strategies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press
You have Access
204
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Salmonella surveillance: a global survey of public health serotyping
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Salmonella surveillance: a global survey of public health serotyping
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Salmonella surveillance: a global survey of public health serotyping
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *