Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

The utility of seroepidemiology for tracking trends in pertussis infection

  • H. E. QUINN (a1), P. B. McINTYRE (a1), J. L. BACKHOUSE (a1) (a2), H. F. GIDDING (a2), J. BROTHERTON (a1) and G. L. GILBERT (a2)...
Summary

Comparing pertussis epidemiology over time and between countries is confounded by differences in diagnostic and notification practices. Standardized serological methods applied to population-based samples enhance comparability. Population prevalence of different levels of pertussis toxin IgG (PT IgG) antibody, measured by standardized methods, were compared by age group and region of Australia between 1997/1998 and 2002. The proportion of 5- to 9-year-olds with presumptive recent pertussis infection (based on IgG levels ⩾62·5 ELISA units/ml) significantly decreased in 2002, consistent with notification data for the same period and improved uptake of booster vaccines following the schedule change from whole-cell to acellular vaccine. In contrast, recent presumptive infection significantly increased in adults aged 35–49 years. Population-based serosurveillance using standardized PT IgG antibody assays has the potential to aid interpretation of trends in pertussis incidence in relation to vaccine programmes and between countries.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The utility of seroepidemiology for tracking trends in pertussis infection
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The utility of seroepidemiology for tracking trends in pertussis infection
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The utility of seroepidemiology for tracking trends in pertussis infection
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Dr H. E. Quinn, National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS), Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, NSW2145, Australia. (Email: helenq@chw.edu.au)
References
Hide All
1.McIntyre, P, et al. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Australia, 1993–1998. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 2000; 24: S1S83.
2.Public Health Committee, National Health and Medical Research Council. Surveillance Case Definitions. Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Publishing Services, 1994.
3.Menzies, R, Wang, H, McIntyre, P. Has pertussis increased in New South Wales over the past decade? An evaluation using hospitalisation and mortality data versus notifications 1988–2002. New South Wales Public Health Bulletin 2003; 14: 7176.
4.de Melker, HE, et al. Specificity and sensitivity of high levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies against pertussis toxin in a single serum sample for diagnosis of infection with Bordetella pertussis. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2000; 38: 800806.
5.Giammanco, A, et al. European Sero-Epidemiology Network: standardisation of the assay results for pertussis. Vaccine 2003; 22: 112120.
6.Pebody, RG, et al. The seroepidemiology of Bordetella pertussis infection in Western Europe. Epidemiology and Infection 2004; 133: 159171.
7.Nardone, A, et al. Sero-epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis in England and Wales. Vaccine 2004; 22: 13141319.
8.Cagney, M, et al. The seroepidemiology of pertussis in Australia during an epidemic period. Epidemiology and Infection 2006; 134: 12081216.
9.Torvaldsen, S, McIntyre, P. Effect of the preschool pertussis booster on national notifications of disease in Australia. Pediatric Infectious Diseases Journal 2003; 22: 956959.
10.Quinn, HE, McIntyre, PB. Pertussis epidemiology in Australia over the decade 1995–2005 – trends by region and age group. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 2007; 31: 205215.
11.National Health and Medical Research Council. The Australian Immunisation Handbook, 9th edn.Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 2008.
12.Brotherton, J, et al. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Australia, 2003 to 2005. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 2007; 31: S1S152.
13.Gidding, H. Australia's national serosurveillance program. New South Wales Public Health Bulletin 2003; 14: 9093.
14.Kelly, H, et al. A random cluster survey and a convenience sample give comparable estimates of immunity to vaccine preventable diseases in children of school age in Victoria, Australia. Vaccine 2002; 20: 31303136.
15.Giammanco, A, et al. Analogous IgG subclass response to pertussis toxin in vaccinated children, healthy or affected by whooping cough. Vaccine 2003; 21: 19241931.
16.Deeks, S, et al. Failure of physicians to consider the diagnosis of pertussis in children. Clinical Infectious Diseases 1999; 28: 840846.
17.Horby, P, et al. A boarding school outbreak of pertussis in adolescents: value of laboratory diagnostic methods. Epidemiology and Infection 2005; 133: 229236.
18.Australian Bureau of Statistics. Children's immunisation Australia. Canberra: AGPS, 1995 (catalogue no. 4352.0).
19.Brotherton, J, et al. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination coverage in Australia, 2001–2002. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 2004; 28: S1S116.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed