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Acceptance of an intended smoking ban in an alcohol dependence clinic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Daniele Fabio Zullino
Affiliation:
Division of Substance Abuse, Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Lausanne, Clinique de Cery, 1008 Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland
Jacques Besson
Affiliation:
Division of Substance Abuse, Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Lausanne, Clinique de Cery, 1008 Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland
Bernard Favrat
Affiliation:
Division of Substance Abuse, Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Lausanne, Clinique de Cery, 1008 Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland
Sonia Krenz
Affiliation:
Division of Substance Abuse, Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Lausanne, Clinique de Cery, 1008 Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland
Gregoire Zimmermann
Affiliation:
Division of Substance Abuse, Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Lausanne, Clinique de Cery, 1008 Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland
Christiane Schnyder
Affiliation:
Division of Substance Abuse, Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Lausanne, Clinique de Cery, 1008 Prilly, Lausanne, Switzerland
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Abstract

Alcohol treatment professionals are often reluctant to address tobacco dependence in their patients or to implement smoke-free policies in inpatient treatment programs, fearing, among others, non-adherence to alcohol treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acceptance of an intended smoking ban in a specialized hospital for alcohol withdrawal. Fifteen of 54 patients reported that they would not begin or quit alcohol treatment if smoking were banned in the clinic, but only five would not begin or quit if nicotine replacement were available. The present study indicates that a non-smoking policy would be feasible in a Swiss alcohol clinic, without jeopardizing alcohol treatment adherence.

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Short communication
Copyright
Copyright © Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS 2003

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