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GROW: a model for mentorship to advance women's leadership in global health

  • K. M. Yount (a1), S. Miedema (a2), K. H. Krause (a3), C. J. Clark (a4), J. S. Chen (a4) and C. del Rio (a4)...
Abstract

In this essay, we discuss the under-representation of women in leadership positions in global health (GH) and the importance of mentorship to advance women's standing in the field. We then describe the mentorship model of GROW, Global Research for Women. We describe the theoretical origins of the model and an adapted theory of change explaining how the GROW model for mentorship advances women's careers in GH. We present testimonials from a range of mentees who participated in a pilot of the GROW model since 2015. These mentees describe the capability-enhancing benefits of their mentorship experience with GROW. Thus, preliminary findings suggest that the GROW mentorship model is a promising strategy to build women's leadership in GH. We discuss supplemental strategies under consideration and next steps to assess the impact of GROW, providing the evidence to inform best practices for curricula elsewhere to build women's leadership in GH.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: Kathryn M. Yount, Hubert Department of Global Health and Department of Sociology, Asa Griggs Candler Chair of Global Health, 1518 Clifton Rd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. (Email: kyount@emory.edu)
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Global Health, Epidemiology and Genomics
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2054-4200
  • URL: /core/journals/global-health-epidemiology-and-genomics
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