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The Underrepresentation of Women in Prestigious Ethics Journals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

Abstract

The main goal of this study is to determine whether women are underrepresented in prestigious ethics journals relative to their representation in the field of ethics. Our study proceeds in three steps. Step one: we estimate the percentage of women who specialize in ethics. Step two: we estimate the percentage of articles in prestigious ethics journals that are authored by women. Step three: we examine whether there is any difference between the percentage of women who specialize in ethics and the percentage of articles in prestigious ethics journals that are authored by women. We conclude that women are underrepresented in prestigious ethics journals relative to their representation in the field of ethics.

Type
Found Cluster: Issues in the Profession
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Hypatia, Inc.

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