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Microbial Aerosol Contamination of Dental Healthcare Workers' Faces and Other Surfaces in Dental Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Emilia Prospero*
Affiliation:
University of Ancona, Ancona, Italy
Sandra Savini
Affiliation:
University of Ancona, Ancona, Italy
Isidoro Annino
Affiliation:
University of Ancona, Ancona, Italy
*
Università di Ancona, Istituto di Malattie Infettive e Medicina Pubblica, Cattedra di Igiene, Piazza Roma, 2, 60100 Ancona, Italy

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to focus attention on the need to adopt infection control procedures in dentistry. The quantitative and qualitative bacterial contamination of dental healthcare workers' faces and other surfaces in dental practice was determined. Oral fluids become aerosolized during dentistry and oral microbes have been used as the markers of their spread that may carry blood-borne pathogens.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2003

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