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Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus Pyogenes Isolates to investigate an outbreak of Puerperal Sepsis

  • Josette Raymond (a1), Laurent Schlegel (a2), Fabien Garnier (a1) and Anne Bouvet (a2)
Abstract</title><sec id='abs1'><title>Objective:</title><p>To describe microbiological characteristics and epidemiologic features of an outbreak of postpartum endometritis.</p></sec><sec id='abs2'><title>Methods:</title><p>Various markers were investigated in five patients and three throat carriage isolates of <span class='italic'>Streptococcus pyogenes</span> obtained during an outbreak of endometritis occurring in a 13-week period. Molecular characterization included biotyping, T-serotyping, <span class='italic'>emm</span> gene sequence and restriction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis.</p></sec><sec id='abs3'><title>Results:</title><p>Biotype, T-serotype, and genotypic data (<span class='italic'>emm</span> analysis, PFGE, and RAPD analysis) revealed a close relationship among the isolates from three patients, suggesting that cross-contamination had occurred. These isolates were biotype 1, T type 28, and <span class='italic'>emm</span> type 28. The isolates from one patient and one carrier differed from those of the index patient by minor variations of the <span class='italic'>emm</span> amplicon restriction pattern, PFGE pattern, or RAPD pattern. The remaining isolates were phenotypically and genetically different.</p></sec><sec id='abs4'><title>Conclusion:
AbstractObjective:

To describe microbiological characteristics and epidemiologic features of an outbreak of postpartum endometritis.

Methods:

Various markers were investigated in five patients and three throat carriage isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes obtained during an outbreak of endometritis occurring in a 13-week period. Molecular characterization included biotyping, T-serotyping, emm gene sequence and restriction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis.

Results:

Biotype, T-serotype, and genotypic data (emm analysis, PFGE, and RAPD analysis) revealed a close relationship among the isolates from three patients, suggesting that cross-contamination had occurred. These isolates were biotype 1, T type 28, and emm type 28. The isolates from one patient and one carrier differed from those of the index patient by minor variations of the emm amplicon restriction pattern, PFGE pattern, or RAPD pattern. The remaining isolates were phenotypically and genetically different.

Conclusion:

Identification of different isolates demonstrated that different strains may circulate simultaneously during a true outbreak and that the predominant strain might persist for several months.

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Corresponding author
Centre National de Réference des Streptocoques, Service de Microbiologie, Hòtel Dieu, Université Paris V, 1 place du Parvis Notre-Dame, F 75181 Paris 04, Franceanne.bouvet@htd.ap-hop-paris.fr
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Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • ISSN: 0899-823X
  • EISSN: 1559-6834
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