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Reducing Transmission Risk Through High-Level Disinfection of Transvaginal Ultrasound Transducer Handles

  • Andrew Ngu (a1), Glenn McNally (a2), Dipika Patel (a3), Vivian Gorgis (a4), Sandrine Leroy (a5) (a6) and Jon Burdach (a7)...
Abstract

Intracavity ultrasound transducer handles are not routinely immersed in liquid high-level disinfectants. We show that residual bacteria, including pathogens, persist on more than 80% of handles that are not disinfected, whereas use of an automated device reduces contamination to background levels. Clinical staff should consider the need for handle disinfection.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;00(0): 1–4

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Address correspondence to Andrew Ngu, MBBS, FRANZCOG, DDU, COGU, East Melbourne Ultrasound, Suite 1, 23 Clarendon St., East Melbourne, Victoria, 3002 Australia (ngu@emultrasound.com.au).
References
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Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology
  • ISSN: 0899-823X
  • EISSN: 1559-6834
  • URL: /core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology
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