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Foreword: Socio-legal studies and the humanities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2009

Dermot Feenan*
Affiliation:
University of Ulster

Abstract

This paper introduces a symposium on socio-legal studies and the humanities, justifying the originality of a dedicated special issue on this topic. The paper identifies and critically examines themes and problems in the literature before introducing the articles in the symposium and, finally, discussing areas for future research.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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