Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order

  • John Gerard Ruggie (a1)
Abstract

The prevailing model of international economic regimes is strictly positivistic in its epistemological orientation and stresses the distribution of material power capabilities in its explanatory logic. It is inadequate to account for the current set of international economic regimes and for the differences between past and present regimes. The model elaborated here departs from the prevailing view in two respects, while adhering to it in a third. First, it argues that regimes comprise not simply what actors say and do, but also what they understand and find acceptable within an intersubjective framework of meaning. Second, it argues that in the economic realm such a framework of meaning cannot be deduced from the distribution of material power capabilities, but must be sought in the configuration of state-society relations that is characteristic of the regime-making states. Third, in incorporating these notions into our understanding of the formation and transformation of international economic regimes, the formulation self-consciously strives to remain at the systemic level and to avoid becoming reductionist in attributing cause and effect relations. The article can therefore argue that the prevailing view is deficient on its own terms and must be expanded and modified. Addressing the world of actual international economic regimes, the article argues that the pax Britannica and the pax Americana cannot be equated in any meaningful sense, and that the postwar regimes for money and trade live on notwithstanding premature announcements of their demise.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Oran R. Young , “International Regimes: Problems of Concept Formation,” World Politics, 32 (041980)

Peter Blau , “Critical Remarks on Weber's Theory of Authority,” American Political Science Review 57 (061963)

Harry Eckstein , “Authority Patterns: A Structural Basis for Political Inquiry,” American Political Science Review 67 (121973)

Krasner , “State Power and the Structure of International Trade,”” World Politics 28 [041976])

Armand Van Dormael , Brettoh Woods: Birth of a Monetary System (London: Macmillan, 1978), chap. 1

The Rise of Free Trade in Western Europe, 1820–1875,” Journal of Economic History 35 (031975): 2055

Herbert Feis , “The Conflict Over Trade Ideologies,” Foreign Affairs 25 (071947)

Raymond F. Mikesell , “The Role of the International Monetary Agreements in a World of Planned Economies,” Journal of Political Economy 55 (121947)

Charles S. Maier , “The Politics of Productivity: Foundations of American International Economic Policy After World War II,” International Organization 31 (Autumn1977)

Robert W. Cox , “Labor and Hegemony,” International Organization 31 (Summer1977)

Richard N. Cooper , “Prolegomena to the Choice of an International Monetary System,” International Organization 29 (Winter1975), p. 85

Jacob Viner , “Conflicts of Principle in Drafting a Trade Charter,” Foreign Affairs 25 (011947), p. 613

Robert Gilpin , U.S. Power and the Multinational Corporation (New York: Basic Books, 1975)

Benjamin J. Cohen , Organizing the World's Money (New York: Basic Books, 1977), chap. 4, fn. 24

Stephen D. Krasner , “The Tokyo Round: Particularistic Interests and Prospects for Stability in the Global Trading System,” International Studies Quarterly 23 (121979)

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

International Organization
  • ISSN: 0020-8183
  • EISSN: 1531-5088
  • URL: /core/journals/international-organization
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 2474 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 4341 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st September 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.