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A morphometric examination of neuronal and glial cell pathology in the orbitofrontal cortex in late-life depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2010

Ahmad Khundakar*
Affiliation:
Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.
Christopher Morris
Affiliation:
Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.
Arthur Oakley
Affiliation:
Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.
Alan J. Thomas
Affiliation:
Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Ahmad Khundakar, Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE4 5PL, U.K. Phone: +44 (0)191 445 5212; Fax: +44 (0)191 445 6685. Email: ahmad.khundakar@ncl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Background: The orbitofrontal cortex has been implicated as a key component in depression by several imaging studies. This study aims to examine morphometrically glial cell and neuronal density and neuronal volume in the orbitofrontal cortex of late-life major depression patients.

Methods: Post mortem tissue from 13 patients with major depression and 11 matched controls was obtained and analyzed using the optical disector and nucleator methods.

Results: No changes were found in glial cell, pyramidal or non-pyramidal neuron density, or in non-pyramidal and pyramidal neuron volume in the orbitofrontal cortex.

Conclusions: Based on previous findings, this study suggests variability in morphological changes within the orbitofrontal cortex, as well as the prefrontal cortex as a whole.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2010

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