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Interaction between finger millet (Eleusine coracana) genotypes and drug-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense in calcareous soil

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

R. Rai
Affiliation:
Rajendra Agricultural University, Dholi Campus, Muzaffarpur-84312l, Bihar, India
V. Prasad
Affiliation:
Rajendra Agricultural University, Dholi Campus, Muzaffarpur-84312l, Bihar, India
I. C. Shukla
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, University of Allahabad, India

Summary

Azospirillum brasilense was treated with nitrosoguanidine and five drug-resistant mutant strains isolated. The effects of acriflavin on pre- and post-irradiation with u.v. light and the level of antibiotic resistance were studied. Variations in factors were found between the strains. Inoculation of finger millet with A. brasilense and mutant strains led to significant increases in grain yield and nitrogenase activity compared with the uninoculated control, with significant strain x genotype interactions. Differential response of genotype and strain was noted on the protein and amino acid concentration of seeds.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1984

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Interaction between finger millet (Eleusine coracana) genotypes and drug-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense in calcareous soil
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Interaction between finger millet (Eleusine coracana) genotypes and drug-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense in calcareous soil
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