Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Richard Hooker and John Calvin

  • P. D. L. Avis
Extract

At a time when the theology of the reformed English Church was in the process of formation, Richard Hooker was compelled by the pressure of puritan argument to come to terms with Calvin's theological legacy and the Genevan experiment in theocracy—upheld by English reformists as the perfect model of a reformed Church. Hooker himself had been schooled in Calvinist theology: his nineteenth-century editor, John Keble, suggested that his earliest work revealed him to be still under the spell of the puritan divines who looked to Calvin and his successor Beza for their inspiration. Another nineteenth-century commentator, F. D. Maurice, observed that Hooker not merely reverenced but trembled before the name of Calvin, pointing out that ‘the caution and hesitancy of Hooker in finding fault with the foreign Reformer, when he was most disposed to be severe upon his English imitators, show how much the metaphysics of the Institutes governed his mind.’

Copyright
References
Hide All

1 The Works of Mr Richard Hooker, ed. Keble, John, Oxford 1845, i. p. xlviii (cited in the text hereafter as HW by volume and page). Maurice, F. D., Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy, London 1872, ii. 191.

2 Thompson, W. D. J. Cargill, ‘The Philosopher of the “Politic society.”’, in Studies in Richard Hooker: Essays Preliminary to an Edition of his Works, ed. Hill, W. Speed, Cleveland and London 1972, 14f. All references to Cargill Thompson are to his argument in this essay.

3 Coleridge on the Seventeenth Century, ed. Brinkley, R. F., Duke University Press 1955, 148.

4 On the power of preaching in the thought of Hooker and Cartwright, see my The Church in the Theology of the Reformers, London (Marshall's Theological Library) and Atlanta (John Knox Press) 1980, part 2, ch. 1. On the state of clerical education and the reasons behind it, see O'Day, Rosemary, ‘The Reformation of the Ministry: 1558–1642’, in Continuity and Change: Personnel and Administration of the Church in England: 1500–1642, ed. O'Day, R. and Heal, F., Leicester University Press 1976.

5 On the concept of the true Church and its marks, see my paper ‘“The True Church” in Reformation Theology’, Scottish Jnl of Theology, xxx (1977), 319–45 and the whole of the first part of my above-mentioned book.

6 See my article, ‘Moses and the Magistrate: a study in the rise of Protestant Legalism’, this JOURNAL, xxvi (1975), 149–72.

7 ‘John Jewel, Works (Parker Society) iii, Cambridge 1848, 79, 92.

8 On the Reformation concepts of the godly prince and the Royal Supremacy, see my The Church in the Theology of the Reformers, part 2, chs 4 and 5.

9 See here, ibid., part 1, ch.3.

10 See, for example, Pannier, J., Calvin et l'episcopat, Strasburg 1926; Milner, B. C., Calvin's Doctrine ofthe Church, Leiden 1970, especially p. 148; McNeill, J. T., ‘The Doctrine of the Ministry in Reformed Theology’, Church History, xii (1943), 7797.

11 Pattison, Mark, ‘Calvin at Geneva’, Essays, ed. Nettleship, L., Oxford 1889, ii. 20 (first published in the Westminster Review in 1858).

12 See Niesel, W., The Theology of Calvin, London 1956, 200.

13 Browne, Sir Thomas, Religio Medici, Oxford 1909, 8. I have pursued the theme of this article into the nineteenth century in research into interpretations of the Reformation among the Coleridgeans and the Tractarians in the context of the romantic and historical movements. See my article ‘The Shaking of the Seven Hills’, Scottish Jnl of Theology, xxxii (1979), 439–55. My book The Shaking of the Seven Hills: Romanticism, the Reformation and Philosophy of History will present the results of this research.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The Journal of Ecclesiastical History
  • ISSN: 0022-0469
  • EISSN: 1469-7637
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-ecclesiastical-history
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed