Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-dksz7 Total loading time: 0.217 Render date: 2021-07-27T13:05:17.802Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Assessment of anthelmintic efficacy against cattle gastrointestinal nematodes in western France and southern Italy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2020

C. Chartier
Affiliation:
INRAE, Oniris, BIOEPAR, 44300Nantes, France
N. Ravinet
Affiliation:
INRAE, Oniris, BIOEPAR, 44300Nantes, France
A. Bosco
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Napoli Federico II, CREMOPAR, Napoli, Italy
E. Dufourd
Affiliation:
INRAE, Oniris, BIOEPAR, 44300Nantes, France
M. Gadanho
Affiliation:
INRAE, Oniris, BIOEPAR, 44300Nantes, France
A. Chauvin
Affiliation:
INRAE, Oniris, BIOEPAR, 44300Nantes, France
J. Charlier
Affiliation:
Kreavet, Hendrik Mertensstraat 17, 9150Kruibeke, Belgium
M.P. Maurelli
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Napoli Federico II, CREMOPAR, Napoli, Italy
G. Cringoli
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Napoli Federico II, CREMOPAR, Napoli, Italy
L. Rinaldi
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Napoli Federico II, CREMOPAR, Napoli, Italy
Corresponding

Abstract

Our objective was to measure the efficacy of ivermectin (IVM) and benzimidazoles (BZ, i.e. fenbendazole and albendazole) in 15 cattle farms in western France and southern Italy. A total of 11 groups were treated with IVM and 11 with BZ. Efficacy was assessed by calculating the percentage of faecal egg count reduction (%FECR) using the pre- and post-treatment arithmetic means. Anthelmintic resistance was considered to be present when the %FECR was <95% and the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval <90%. For IVM, the percentages of FECR ranged from 73% to 100%. Lack of efficacy to IVM was detected in two farms out of four in France, but was not detected in any of the seven farms in Italy. For BZ, the percentages of FECR ranged from 95% to 100%. No case of BZ resistance was detected in the five farms in France and the six farms in Italy.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Coles, GC, Bauer, C, Borgsteede, FH, Geerts, S, Klei, TR, Taylor, MA and Waller, PJ (1992) World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (W.A.A.V.P.) methods for the detection of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of veterinary importance. Veterinary Parasitology 44, 3544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coles, GC, Jackson, F, Pomroy, WE, Prichard, RK, von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G, Silvestre, A, Taylor, MA and Vercruysse, J (2006) The detection of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of veterinary importance. Veterinary Parasitology 136, 167185.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cringoli, G, Maurelli, MP, Levecke, B, Bosco, A, Vercruysse, J, Utzinger, J and Rinaldi, L (2017) The Mini-FLOTAC technique for the diagnosis of helminth and protozoan infections in humans and animals. Nature Protocols 12, 17231732.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Demeler, J, Kleinschmidt, N, Küttler, U, Koopmann, R and von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G (2012) Evaluation of the egg hatch assay and the larval migration inhibition assay to detect anthelmintic resistance in cattle parasitic nematodes on farms. Parasitology International 61, 614618.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Demeler, J, Van Zeveren, AM, Kleinschmidt, N, et al. (2009) Monitoring the efficacy of ivermectin and albendazole against gastro intestinal nematodes of cattle in Northern Europe. Veterinary Parasitology 160, 109115.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Geurden, T, Chartier, C, Fanke, J, et al. (2015) Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe. International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance 5, 163171.Google Scholar
Kochapakdee, S, Pandey, VS, Pralomkarm, W, Choldumrongkul, S, Ngampongsai, W and Lawpetchara, A (1995) Anthelmintic resistance in goats in southern Thailand. Veterinary Record 137, 124125.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Levecke, B, Dobson, RJ, Speybroeck, N, Vercruysse, J and Charlier, J (2012) Novel insights in the faecal egg count reduction test for monitoring drug efficacy against gastrointestinal nematodes of veterinary importance. Veterinary Parasitology 188, 9196.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Levecke, B, Kaplan, RM, Thamsborg, SM, Torgerson, PR, Vercruysse, J and Dobson, RJ (2018) How to improve the standardization and the diagnostic performance of the fecal egg count reduction test? Veterinary Parasitology 253, 7178.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MAFF (Ed) (1986) Manual of veterinary parasitological techniques. London, Her Majesty's Stationary Office, 160 pp.Google Scholar
Martínez-Valladares, M, Geurden, T, Bartram, DJ, Martínez-Pérez, JM, Robles-Pérez, D, Bohórquez, A, Florez, E, Meana, A and Rojo-Vázquez, FA (2015) Resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes to the most commonly used anthelmintics in sheep, cattle and horses in Spain. Veterinary Parasitology 211, 228233.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Paras, KL, George, MM, Vidyashankar, AN and Kaplan, RM (2018) Comparison of fecal egg counting methods in four livestock species. Veterinary Parasitology 257, 2127.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peña-Espinoza, M, Thamsborg, SM, Denwood, M, Drag, M, Hansen, TV, Jensen, VF and Enemark, HL (2016) Efficacy of ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Denmark evaluated by different methods for analysis of faecal egg count reduction. International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance 6, 241250.Google ScholarPubMed
Rose, H, Rinaldi, L, Bosco, A, Mavrot, F, de Waal, T, Skuce, P and Morgan, ER (2015) Widespread anthelmintic resistance in European farmed ruminants: a systematic review. Veterinary Record 176, 546.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Wyk, JA and Mayhew, E (2013) Morphological identification of parasitic nematode infective larvae of small ruminants and cattle: a practical lab guide. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 80, 114.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G, Coles, GC, Jackson, F, et al. (2009) Standardization of the egg hatch test for the detection of benzimidazole resistance in parasitic nematodes. Parasitology Research 105, 825834.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Assessment of anthelmintic efficacy against cattle gastrointestinal nematodes in western France and southern Italy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Assessment of anthelmintic efficacy against cattle gastrointestinal nematodes in western France and southern Italy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Assessment of anthelmintic efficacy against cattle gastrointestinal nematodes in western France and southern Italy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *