Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-nlvjk Total loading time: 0.235 Render date: 2022-05-18T12:30:56.017Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Histochemical Studies of the Skin and Intestine of Dogs Infected with Ancylostoma caninum Larvae

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2009

Debiprasad Banerjee M. G. Deo
Affiliation:
Section of Parasitology, Department of Microbiology and Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
Om Prakash
Affiliation:
Section of Parasitology, Department of Microbiology and Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Extract

The penetration of the juveniles through the intestinal tissue caused breakdown of the carbohydrate complexes present in the area and in general the infected intestinal tissue had low carbohydrate content as compared to the control as revealed by several staining procedures. Results of the tests for lipids and proteins were not conclusive. The cytoplasmic RNA of the infected intestine and skin became more pyroninophilic and could account for an increase of RNA content in the infected tissue.

There was an increase of the alkaline phosphatase activity and a decrease in the fibrin content in the infected intestine. Tests for pigments and amyloid and hyaluronidase extraction procedures were inconclusive.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1972

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anantaraman, M., 1942.—“The life-history of Oesophagostomum radiatum. the bovine nodular worm.“ Indian J. vet. Sci., 12, 87.Google Scholar
Banerjee, Debiprasad and Singh, K. S., 1969.—“Studies on Cysticercus fasciolaris. II. Histochemical studies on Taenia taeniaeformis: changes in rat's intestine and oncosphere during penetration.” Indian J. anim. Sci., 39, 155.Google Scholar
Banerjee, Debiprasad, Prakash, Om and Deo, M. G., 1970.—“Studies on Ancylostoma caninum in mice following percutaneous and intraperitoneal routes of infection.” Indian J. med. Res., 58, 1313.Google ScholarPubMed
Gersh, I., 1950.—“Glycoproteins in the thyroid gland of rats.” J. Endocrinol., 6, 282.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gersh, I., 1952.—“Ground substance and the plasticity of connective tissue.” Hervey Lecture, 45, 211.Google Scholar
Gersh, I., AND Catchpole, H. R., 1949.—“The organisation of ground substance and basement membrane and its significance in tissue injury, disease and growthAm. J. Anat., 85, 457.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuwamura, T., 1958.—“Study on experimental clonorchiasis especially on the histochemical change in the liver.” Shikoku Acta Medico, 12, 28.Google Scholar
Lee, C. L. and Lewert, R. M., 1957.—“Studies on the presence of mucopolysaccharidase in penetrating helminth larvae.” J. infect. Dis., 101, 287.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewert, R. M., 1958.—“Invasiveness of helminth larvae.” Rice Inst. Pamphlet, 45, 97.Google Scholar
Lewert, R. M. and Lee, C. L., 1951.—“The effect of helminths on the basement membrane and ground substance of the host: a study of the mechanism of penetration.” J. Parasit., 37, (Sect. 2), 20.Google Scholar
Lewert, R. M. and Lee, C. L., 1954.—“Studies on the passage of helminth larvae through host tissues. I. Histochemical studies on extracellular changes caused by penetrating larvae. II. Enzymic activity of larvae in vitro and in vivo.” J. infect. Dis., 95, 19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewert, R. M. and Lee, C. L. 1950.—“Quantitative studies of the collagenase-like enzymes of cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni and Strongyloides ratti.” J. infect. Dis., 99, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lillik, R. D., 1954.—Histopathologic Technic and Practical Histochemistry. pp. 1501. The Blackiston Co. Inc., New York.Google Scholar
Pearse, A. G. E., 1960.—Histochemistry, Theoretical and Applied. 2nd edn., pp. 1998. J. & A. Churchill Ltd., London.Google Scholar
Perl, E. and Catchpole, H. R., 1950.—“Changes induced in the connective tissue of the pubic symphysis of the guinea-pig with oestrogen and relaxin.” Arch. Path., 50, 233.Google ScholarPubMed
Silverman, P. H. and Maneely, R. B., 1955.—“Studies on the biology of some tapeworms of the genus Taenia. III. The role of the secreting gland of the hexacanth embryo in the penetration of the intestinal njucosa of the intermediate host, and some of its histochemical reactions.” Ann. trop. Med. Parasit., 49, 326.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sita Devi, C., Murthy, D. P., Lakshmi Devi, S. and Reddy, C. R. R. M. 1971.—“Fibrinolytic activity of infective larvae of Dracunculus medinensis.” Am. J. trop. Med. Hyg., 20, 101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stirewalt, M. A., 1966.—“Skin Penetration Mechanisms of Helminths.” In : Biology of Parasites : by E. J. L., Soulsby, Academic Press, New York, p. 4159.Google Scholar
Tamaki, J., 1961.—“Studies on hyaluronidase of Ancylostoma caninum larvae.” Jap. J. Parasit., 10, 692.Google Scholar
Thorson, R. E., 1953.—“Studies on the mechanism of immunity in the rat to the nematode, Nipposirongylus muris.” Am. J. Hyg., 58, 1.Google ScholarPubMed

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Histochemical Studies of the Skin and Intestine of Dogs Infected with Ancylostoma caninum Larvae
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Histochemical Studies of the Skin and Intestine of Dogs Infected with Ancylostoma caninum Larvae
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Histochemical Studies of the Skin and Intestine of Dogs Infected with Ancylostoma caninum Larvae
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *