Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Do patients benefit from physiotherapy for shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection? A systematic review

  • A S Harris (a1)

Abstract

Objective

Accessory nerve palsy affects a proportion of patients following neck dissection, and results in shoulder dysfunction and regional pain. This project aimed to establish the evidence supporting post-operative physiotherapy for the shoulder following neck dissection.

Method

A systematic review was conducted of prospective trials investigating the efficacy of rehabilitation for shoulder or upper limb dysfunction and pain following any type of neck dissection.

Results

A total of 820 papers were identified; through a staged review process, 7 trials were found that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These included three randomised, controlled trials and four non-randomised studies. Five out of the seven trials demonstrated a statistically significant benefit of physiotherapy.

Conclusion

Current evidence shows a benefit from physiotherapy in patients with shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection. Some evidence suggests progressive resistance is superior to other types of physiotherapy. Long-term benefit and cost efficacy have not been studied.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Do patients benefit from physiotherapy for shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection? A systematic review
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Do patients benefit from physiotherapy for shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection? A systematic review
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Do patients benefit from physiotherapy for shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection? A systematic review
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Mr Andrew S Harris, Blenheim Head and Neck Unit, The Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK E-mail: drewharris@doctors.org.uk

Footnotes

Hide All

Mr A S Harris takes responsibility for the integrity of the content of the paper

Presented orally at the ENT Wales Academic Meeting, 4 October 2019, Saundersfoot, Wales, UK.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1McGarvey, AC, Osmotherly, PG, Hoffman, GR, Chiarelli, PE. Impact of neck dissection on scapular muscle function: a case-controlled electromyographic study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2013;94:113–19
2Sheikh, A, Shallwani, H, Ghaffar, S. Postoperative shoulder function after different types of neck dissection in head and neck cancer. Ear Nose Throat J 2014;93:E21–6
3Bradley, PJ, Ferlito, A, Silver, CE, Takes, RP, Woolgar, JA, Strojan, P et al. Neck treatment and shoulder morbidity: still a challenge. Head Neck 2011;33:1060–7
4Gane, EM, O'Leary, SP, Hatton, AL, Panizza, BJ, McPhail, SM. Neck and upper limb dysfunction in patients following neck dissection: looking beyond the shoulder. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2017;157:631–40
5Gallagher, KK, Sacco, AG, Lee, JS, Taylor, R, Chanowski, EJ, Bradford, CR et al. Association between multimodality neck treatment and work and leisure impairment: a disease-specific measure to assess both impairment and rehabilitation after neck dissection. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2015;141:888–93
6van Wouwe, M, de Bree, R, Kuik, DJ, de Goede, CJ, Verdonck-de Leeuw, IM, Doornaert, P et al. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck. Radiother Oncol 2009;90:196201
7Su, BM, Moayer, R, Kuan, EC, St John, MA. When should a level IIB neck dissection be performed in treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? Laryngoscope 2018;128:1739–40
8Robinson, M, Ward, L, Mehanna, H, Paleri, V, Winter, SC. Provision of physiotherapy rehabilitation following neck dissection in the UK. J Laryngol Otol 2018;132:624–7
9Moher, D, Liberati, A, Tetzlaff, J, Altman, DG(for the PRISMA Group). Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement. BMJ 2009;339:b2535
10McNeely, ML, Parliament, M, Courneya, KS, Seikaly, H, Jha, N, Scrimger, R et al. A pilot study of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance exercise training on shoulder dysfunction caused by spinal accessory neurapraxia/neurectomy in head and neck cancer survivors. Head Neck 2004;26:518–30
11Shimada, Y, Chida, S, Matsunaga, T, Sato, M, Hatakeyama, K, Itoi, E. Clinical results of rehabilitation for accessory nerve palsy after radical neck dissection. Acta Otolaryngol 2007;127:491–7
12McNeely, ML, Parliament, MB, Seikaly, H, Jha, N, Magee, DJ, Haykowsky, MJ et al. Effect of exercise on upper extremity pain and dysfunction in head and neck cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial. Cancer 2008;113:214–22
13Nibu, K, Ebihara, Y, Ebihara, M, Kawabata, K, Onitsuka, T, Fujii, T et al. Quality of life after neck dissection: a multicenter longitudinal study by the Japanese Clinical Study Group on Standardization of Treatment for Lymph Node Metastasis of Head and Neck Cancer. Int J Clin Oncol 2010;15:33–8
14Lauchlan, DT, McCaul, JA, McCarron, T, Patil, S, McManners, J, McGarva, J. An exploratory trial of preventative rehabilitation on shoulder disability and quality of life in patients following neck dissection surgery. Eur J Cancer Care 2011;20:113–22
15Wu, P, Peng, Z, Chen, J, Hu, Y. Uncertain effect of preventative shoulder rehabilitation for patients who underwent total laryngectomy with neck dissection. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2018;275:795801
16Do, JH, Yoon, IJ, Cho, YK, Ahn, JS, Kim, JK, Jeon, J. Comparison of hospital based and home based exercise on quality of life, and neck and shoulder function in patients with spinal accessary nerve injury after head and neck cancer surgery. Oral Oncol 2018;86:100–4
17Cnossen, IC, van Uden-Kraan, CF, Rinkel, RN, Aalders, IJ, de Goede, CJ, de Bree, R et al. Multimodal guided self-help exercise program to prevent speech, swallowing, and shoulder problems among head and neck cancer patients: a feasibility study. J Med Internet Res 2014;16:e74

Keywords

Do patients benefit from physiotherapy for shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection? A systematic review

  • A S Harris (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed