Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Knowledge of the audiological effects, symptoms and practices related to personal listening devices of health sciences students at a South African university

  • R Y Seedat (a1), R Ehlers (a1), Y Lee (a1), C Mung'omba (a1), K Plaatjies (a1), M Prins (a1), M Randeree (a1), M Zakhura (a1) and G Joubert (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

This study aimed to determine the knowledge of first year health sciences students at a South African university regarding hearing loss and symptoms attributable to personal listening devices and their practices concerning the use of personal listening devices.

Method

This was a cross-sectional study carried out using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire.

Results

Of 336 students, 269 (80.1 per cent) completed the questionnaire. While most participants could identify symptoms that could be caused by extensive use of personal listening devices, almost 30 per cent did not know that it could cause permanent hearing loss. Personal listening devices were used by 90.7 per cent of participants, with 77.8 per cent having used them for more than five years. Use was at a high volume in 14.9 per cent of participants and for more than 2 hours per day in 52.7 per cent.

Conclusion

The findings indicate the need for an educational programme to inform students as to safe listening practices when using personal listening devices.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Prof R Y Seedat, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein9300, South Africa E-mail: seedatry@ufs.ac.za

Footnotes

Hide All

Prof R Y Seedat takes responsibility for the integrity of the content of the paper

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1Portnuff, C. Reducing the risk of music-induced hearing loss from overuse of portable listening devices: understanding the problems and establishing strategies for improving awareness in adolescents. Adolesc Health Med Ther 2016;7:2735
2Portnuff, CDF, Fligor, BJ, Arehart, KH. Teenage use of portable listening devices: a hazard to hearing? J Am Acad Audiol 2011;22:663–77
3Levey, S, Fligor, B, Ginocchi, C, Kagimbi, L. The effects of noise-induced hearing loss on children and young adults. Contemp Issues Commun Sci Disord 2012;39:7683
4Hussain, T, Chou, C, Zettner, E, Torre, P, Hans, S, Gauer, J et al. Early indication of noise-induced hearing loss in young adult users of personal listening devices. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2018;127:703–9
5World Health Organization. Hearing Loss due to Recreational Exposure to Loud Sounds: A Review. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2015
6Rawool, VW, Colligon-Wayne, LA. Auditory lifestyles and beliefs related to hearing loss among college students in the USA. Noise Health 2008;10:110
7Basu, S, Garg, S, Singh, MM, Kohli, C. Knowledge and practices related to the use of personal audio devices and associated health risks among medical students in Delhi. J Educ Health Promot 2019;8:42
8Sulaiman, AH, Husain, R, Seluakumaran, K. Hearing risk among young personal listening device users: effects at high-frequency and extended high-frequency audiogram thresholds. J Int Adv Otol 2015;11:104–9
9Hutchinson Marron, K, Marchiondo, K, Stephenson, S, Wagner, S, Cramer, I, Wharton, T et al. . College students’ personal listening device usage and knowledge. Int J Audiol 2015;54:384–90
10Portnuff, CDF, Fligor, BJ, Arehart, KH. Self-report and long-term field measures of MP3 player use: how accurate is self-report? Int J Audiol 2013;52:S3340
11Hoover, A, Krishnamurti, S. Survey of college students’ MP3 listening: habits, safety issues, attitudes, and education. Am J Audiol 2010;19:7383
12Ahmed, S, Fallah, S, Garrido, B, Gross, A, King, M, Morrish, T et al. Use of portable audio devices by university students. Can Acoust 2007;35:3552
13Levey, S, Levey, T, Fligor, BJ. Noise exposure estimates of urban MP3 player users. J Speech Lang Hear Res 2011;54:263–77
14Torre, P. Young adults’ use and output level settings of personal music systems. Ear Hear 2008;29:791–9
15Lee, GJC, Lim, MY, Kuan, AYW, Teo, JHW, Tan, HG, Low, WK. The music listening preferences and habits of youths in Singapore and its relation to leisure noise-induced hearing loss. Singapore Med J 2014;55:72–7
16Diviani, N, Zanini, C, Amann, J, Chadha, S, Cieza, A, Rubinelli, S. Awareness, attitudes, and beliefs about music-induced hearing loss: towards the development of a health communication strategy to promote safe listening. Patient Educ Couns 2019;102:1506–12
17World Health Organization and International Telecommunication Union. Toolkit for Safe Listening Devices and Systems. Geneva: World Health Organization and International Telecommunication Union, 2019
18World Health Organization and International Telecommunication Union. Safe Listening Devices and Systems: A WHO-ITU Global Standard. Geneva: World Health Organization and International Telecommunication Union, 2019

Keywords

Knowledge of the audiological effects, symptoms and practices related to personal listening devices of health sciences students at a South African university

  • R Y Seedat (a1), R Ehlers (a1), Y Lee (a1), C Mung'omba (a1), K Plaatjies (a1), M Prins (a1), M Randeree (a1), M Zakhura (a1) and G Joubert (a2)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed