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The role of smartphone applications in clinical practice: a review

  • J Wallace (a1) and R Kanegaonkar (a2) (a3)

Abstract

Objective

The number of medical mobile phone applications continues to grow. Although otorhinolaryngology-specific applications represent a small proportion, there are exciting innovations emerging for the specialty. This article will assess the number of applications available and review how they may be used in clinical practice.

Method

The application stores of the two most popular mobile phone platforms, Apple and android, were searched using multiple search terms.

Results

A total of 107 ENT applications were identified and categorised according to intended use. Eight applications were reviewed in more detail and assessed on whether a doctor or allied health professional was involved in their design and if they were evidence-based.

Conclusion

There are a number of ENT-specific smartphone applications currently available. As the technology progresses, their scope has extended beyond being purely for reference. Nevertheless, it remains difficult to assess the validity and security of these applications.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Dr Jennifer Wallace, Surgical Directorate, Morriston Hospital, Heol Maes Eglwys, Morriston, Cwmrrhydceirw, SwanseaSA6 6NL, Wales, UK E-mail: jennifer.wallace1@nhs.net

Footnotes

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Dr J Wallace takes responsibility for the integrity of the content of the paper

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

The role of smartphone applications in clinical practice: a review

  • J Wallace (a1) and R Kanegaonkar (a2) (a3)

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