Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-b6fb2 Total loading time: 0.183 Render date: 2021-09-24T01:23:11.080Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

All Together Now: Developing a Team Skills Competency Domain for Global Health Education

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Extract

Global health is by definition and necessity a collaborative field; one that requires diverse professionals to address the clinical, biological, social, and political factors that contribute to the health of communities, regions, and nations. For universities with global health programs, the interprofessional nature of global health presents both vast opportunities and distinct challenges. In addition to helping students develop mastery within their chosen fields, universities must also ensure that students learn to collaborate with other professionals to address complex global health needs. While much work has been done in recent years to define the field of global health and set forth discipline-specific competencies, less has been done in the area of interdisciplinary or interprofessional global health education. This gap in scholarship is troubling given the clear and well-acknowledged need for professionals across a broad spectrum of disciplines to take part in global health initiatives.

Type
Independent
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

We use the term “interprofessional” in lieu of “interdisciplinary” throughout the paper, but the terms are interchangeable for the most part. When discussing education of health professionals, there has been an international movement towards the use of the suffix “professional” rather than “disciplinary” in education literature. See Oandasan, I. Reeves, S., “Key Elements for Interprofessional Education. Part 1: The Learner, the Educator and the Learning Context,” Journal of Interprofessional Care 19, no. S1(2005): 2138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See, e.g., Battat, R.et al, “Global Health Competencies and Approaches in Medical Education: A Literature Review,” BMC Medical Education 10, no. 94(2010): 17, available at <http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1472-6920-10-94.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014) (“Global health is the study and practice of improving health and health equity for all people worldwide through international and interdisciplinary collaboration.”) (emphasis added).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
There are three generally accepted broad areas or domains of human behavior in which learning can take place: Thinking (cognitive), doing (psychomotor), and feeling (affective). See Bloom, B., Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I: Cognitive Domain (New York: Longman, 1956) (described in D'Eon, M., “A Blueprint for Interprofessional Learning,” Journal of Interprofessional Care 19, no. S1[2005]: 4959).Others add to these categories a type of learning that is critical to interprofessional learning called social-emotional learning, which relates to how an individual interacts with others and in groups. See Mackway-Jones, K. Walker, M., The Pocket Guide to Teaching for Medical Instructors (London: MMJ Books, 1999) (described in D'Eon, supra, at 49). “‘Non-cognitive skills' refer to a set of attitudes, behaviors, and strategies that are thought to underpin success in school and at work, such as motivation, perseverance, and self-control. They are usually contrasted with ‘hard skills' of cognitive ability in areas such as literacy and numeracy, which are measured by academic tests.”Gutman, L. M. Schoon, I., Institute of Education, The Impact of Non-Cognitive Skills on Outcomes for Young People: Literature Review (2013), available at <http://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/uploads/pdf/Non-cognitive_skills_literature_review.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014).Google Scholar
The authors are aware that numerous global health programs exist at the undergraduate level and some global health programs bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate learning, such as nursing programs that offer global health education at both levels. The concepts and themes in this paper are relevant to undergraduate and bridge programs, but the focus of this paper is graduate education.Google Scholar
By global health “program,” we mean to include the broad range of global health programs available to students, including certificate and degree programs, as well as degree “minors” and subspecialties in global health.Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participants Dr. Bridget Kelly, Senior Program Officer, IOM, and Patricia Cuff, Director of IOM's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See Merson, M. H. Page, K. C., The Dramatic Expansion of University Engagement in Global Health: Implications for U.S. Policy (Washington, D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2009).Google Scholar
See, e.g., Fried, L.et al, “Global Health is Public Health,” The Lancet 375, no. 9714(2010): 535537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See Koplan, J. P.et al, “Towards a Common Definition of Global Health,” The Lancet 373, no. 9679(2009): 19931995 (emphasis added).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See World Health Organization, World Health Report 2006: Working Together for Health (Geneva: World Health Organization, 2006), available at <http://www.who.int/whr/2006/whr06_en.pdf?ua=1>(last visited December 3, 2014).(last+visited+December+3,+2014).>Google Scholar
See Collaborative Justice, “How to Collaborate: A Working Definition of the Term ‘Collaboration,’” an essay adapted from Larsen, C. LaFasto, F., TeamWork: What Must Go Right/What Can Go Wrong (Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 1989), available at <http://www.collaborativejustice.org/how.htm>(last visited December 3, 2014).Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participant Timothy Brewer, Dr., Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary and Cross-campus Affairs, UCLA (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See, e.g., Knapp, M. S.et al, “University-Based Preparation for Collaborative Interprofessional Practice,” Journal of Education Policy 8, no. 5(1993): 137151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cuff, P. A., Interprofessional Education for Collaboration: Learning How to Improve Health from Interprofessional Models across the Continuum of Education to Practice: Workshop Summary (Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press, 2013).Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participant Hala Azzam, Dr., President, CoEmpower LLC (on file with authors).Google Scholar
Consortium of Universities for Global Health, Meeting Report of the Inaugural Meeting, September 7–9, 2008, available at <http://www.cugh.org/about/background>(last visited December 3, 2014).(last+visited+December+3,+2014).>Google Scholar
See, e.g., Wilson, L.et al, “Global Health Competencies for Nurses in America,” Journal of Professional Nursing 28, no. 4(2012): 213222;Battat, , supra note 2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gebbie, K.et al, Center for Health Policy, Competency-to-Curriculum Toolkit (New York: Columbia University School of Nursing, 2004), available at <http://cphp.sph.unc.edu/lifelonglearning/toolkit/Competecy_to_Curriculum_toolkit.pdf>(December 3, 2014).Google Scholar
See Bloom, supra note 3.Google Scholar
See Gebbie, et al, supra note 19.Google Scholar
Interprofessional Education Collaborative, Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (Washington, D.C.: Interprofessional Education Collaborative, 2011), available at <http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education-resources/ipecreport.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014).(last+visited+December+3,+2014).>Google Scholar
See Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), Global Health Competency Model –Final Version 1.1 (October 31, 2011), available at <http://www.aspph.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/NarrativeGraphicGHCompsVersion1.1FINAL-SJC.doc>(last visited December 3, 2014).(last+visited+December+3,+2014).>Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participant Dr. Lynda Wilson, Assistant Dean for International Affairs, Deputy Director, PAHO/WHO Collaborating Center for International Nursing, and Professor, University of Alabama School of Nursing (on file with authors). The CUGH Education Subcommittee on Global Health Competencies has tentatively included the list of team competencies developed in this project (see infra subsection (f)) in their broad list of content competencies.Google Scholar
The ASPPH competencies include a novel and useful “Collaborating and Partnering” domain that relates in some measure to working as part of a global health team but is primarily focused on relationships external to the team, in other words relationships between the team and outside collaborators and partners. See ASPPH, Global Health Competency Model, supra note 25.Google Scholar
GGEI is now housed in the UMB Office of the President and receives its funding through the same office.Google Scholar
See Rowthorn, V., “A Place for All at the Global Health Table: A Case Study about Creating an Interprofessional Global Health Project,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41, no. 4(2013): 907914.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See, e.g., World Health Organization, Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice (2010): At 7, available at <http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2010/WHO_HRH_HPN_10.3_eng.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014).(last+visited+December+3,+2014).>Google Scholar
See, e.g., Barr, H.et al, Effective Interprofessional Education: Argument, Assumption and Evidence (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005).Barr, H.et al, Evaluations of Interprofessional Education: A United Kingdom Review for Health and Social Care (August 2000), available at <http://caipe.org.uk/silo/files/evaluations-of-interprofessional-education.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014).Hammick, M., “A Best Evidence Systematic Review of Interprofessional Education: BEME Guide No. 9,” Medical Teacher 29, no. 8(2007): 735751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See Knapp, et al, supra note 15;Id. (Hammick et al.).Google Scholar
See IPEC Report, supra note 24.Google Scholar
See World Health Organization, Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education & Collaborative Practice (Geneva: WHO Press, 2010), available at <http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2010/WHO_HRH_HPN_10.3_eng.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014).(last+visited+December+3,+2014).>Google Scholar
See Institute of Medicine, Educating for the Health Team (Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences, 1972).Google Scholar
See Institute of Medicine, Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality (Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press, 2003);WHO 2010 Report, supra note 30.Frenk, J.et al, “Health Professionals for a New Century: Transforming Education to Strengthen Health Systems in an Interdependent World,” The Lancet 376, no. 9756(2010): 1923–1958.Google Scholar
These six groups are the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, the Association of Schools of Public Health, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the American Dental Education Association, and the American Association of Medical Colleges.Google Scholar
See IPEC Report, supra, note 24.Google Scholar
See Comments on behalf of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), for the roundtable discussion Building Global Health Team Excellence: Developing an Interprofessional Skills Competency Domain (on file with authors).Google Scholar
Nine of the participants developed their comments into short articles that will appear in a supplement edition of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42, no. 4, Supp.(2014).Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Dr. Andrea Pfeifle, the Assistant Dean and Director of the Center for Interprofessional Health Education and Practice and an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at Indiana University in Indianapolis, Indiana (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See supra text accompanying notes 24–6.Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participants Dr. Samer El-Kamary, Associate Professor, Epidemiology and Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Jon Mark Hirshon Dr. Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See, e.g., Breslow, L., “Teaching Teamwork Skills, Part 2,” MIT Faculty Newsletter: Teach Talk, March/April 1998, at 5.Hills, H., Team-Based Learning (Burlington, VT: Gower, 2001).Reynolds, M. (London: Kogan Page, 1994).Google Scholar
See, e.g., Papadaki, M. Hirsch, G., “Curing Consortium Fatigue,” Science Translational Medicine 5, no. 200(2013): 200fs35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See IPEC Report, supranote 24.Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Dr. Janette Samaan, Director, Global Health Learning Opportunities, AAMC (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Dr. Robert Beardsley, Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See IPEC Report, supra note 24.Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Charity Scott, Catherine Henson, C. Professor of Law and Director for the Center for Law, Health & Society, Georgia State University College of Law (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Dr. Deborah Glassman, Lecturer in Business Economics and Director, Global Business Center and Certificate of International Studies in Business, University of Washington (on file with authors).Google Scholar
Several participants suggested leadership as a potential competency domain in addition to team competencies, citing the importance of leadership to global health work and pointing out that leadership skills were not represented in the domains discussed at the roundtable.Google Scholar
This consideration would be appropriate for programs or classes for which students apply for participation.Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Hala Azzam, Dr., President, CoEmpower, LLC (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See Comments submitted by roundtable participant Toby Treem Guerin, J.D., Managing Director, Center for Dispute Resolution, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See supra text accompanying notes 3132.Google Scholar
See Piterman, L.et al, “Interprofessional Education for Interprofessional Practice: Does It Make a Difference?” Medical Journal of Australia 193, no. 2(2010): 9293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See Comments submitted by Roundtable participant Lori DiPrete Brown, Associate Director for Education and Engagement, Global Health Institute, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison (on file with authors).Google Scholar
Experiential learning is learning that takes place as a result of an encounter with an experience that is planned by instructors within a course, program, or curriculum. See, e.g., Hall, P. Weaver, L., “Interdisciplinary Education and Teamwork: A Long and Winding Road,” Medical Education 35, no. 9(2001): 867875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participant Flora Katz, Dr., Program Officer, Division of International Training and Research, NIH Fogarty International Center (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participant Gregory Carey, Dr., Director of Student Summer Research and Community Outreach, Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Vascular & Inflammatory Diseases, University of Maryland School of Medicine (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See comments submitted by Roundtable participant Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, Professor and Director, Office of Global Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See Gebbie, et al, supra note 19.Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participant Glickman, Leslie B.Dr., Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine (on file with authors).Google Scholar
Ahlstrom, A. W.et al, From Soft Skills to Hard Data: Measuring Youth Program Outcomes, 2nd ed. (Washington, D.C.: Forum for Youth Investment, 2013), available at <http://forumfyi.org/files/soft_skills_hard_data_0.pdf>(last visited December 3, 2014).Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participants Bridget Kelly, Dr., Senior Program Officer, IOM, and Patricia Cuff, Director of IOM's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education (on file with authors).Google Scholar
See comments submitted by roundtable participants Milton, Donald K., Professor and Director, Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public.Muhiuddin Haider, Dr., Research Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Public Health;and Maring, Elisabeth F., Research Assistant Professor & Family Life Specialist, University of Maryland School of Public Health (on file with authors).Google Scholar
13
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

All Together Now: Developing a Team Skills Competency Domain for Global Health Education
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

All Together Now: Developing a Team Skills Competency Domain for Global Health Education
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

All Together Now: Developing a Team Skills Competency Domain for Global Health Education
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *