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Metal coatings on SiC nanowires by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2005

Aaron D. LaLonde*
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920
M. Grant Norton
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920
David N. McIlroy
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
Daqing Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
Radhakrishnan Padmanabhan
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
Abdullah Alkhateeb
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
Hongmei Han
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
Nicholas Lane
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
Zachery Holman
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844-0903
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: lalonde@mail.wsu.edu
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Abstract

Coating of nanowires is being investigated to broaden potential uses for future applications. Coatings of Ni and Pt nanoparticles have been synthesized on silicon carbide nanowires by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Coatings with high particle densities with average particle diameters of 2.76 and 3.28 nm for Pt and Ni, respectively, were formed with narrow size distributions. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition appears to be an efficient method for production of metal coatings on nanowires.

Type
Rapid Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

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