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Unidirectional solidification of Zn-rich Zn-Cu hypoperitectic alloy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Hasan Kaya*
Affiliation:
Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
Sevda Engin
Affiliation:
Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
U. Böyük
Affiliation:
Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
Emin Çadırlı
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Faculty Arts and Sciences, Niğde University, Niğde, Turkey
Necmettin Maraşlı
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Faculty Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: hasankaya@erciyes.edu.tr
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Abstract

Zn-0.7 wt.% Cu-hypoperitectic alloy was prepared in a graphite crucible under a vacuum atmosphere. Unidirectional solidification of the Zn-0.7 wt.% Cu-hypoperitectic alloy was carried out by using a Bridgman-type directional solidification apparatus under two different conditions: (i) with different temperature gradients (G = 3.85–9.95 K/mm) at a constant growth rate (41.63 μm/s) and (ii) with different growth rate ranges (G = 8.33–435.67 μm/s) at a constant temperature gradient (3.85 K/mm). The microstructures of the directionally solidified Zn-0.7 wt.% Cu-hypoperitectic samples were observed to be a cellular structure. From both transverse and longitudinal sections of the samples, cellular spacing (λ) and cell-tip radius (R) were measured. The effects of solidification-processing parameters (G and V) on the microstructure parameters (λ and R) were obtained by using a linear regression analysis. The present experimental results were also compared with the current theoretical and numerical models and similar previous experimental results.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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