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The Rôle of Infection in the Treatment of General Paralysis

  • W. M. McAlister (a1)
Extract

Ever since Wagner von Jauregg directed attention to the results of the treatment of general paralysis by various infective agencies, this matter has been the subject of active investigation in several centres. From a perusal of the literature it seems clear that the best results have been obtained from infection with benign tertian malaria. Moreover, this mode of treatment appears preferable to many others suggested, in view of the fact that it involves a minimum of risk in its application. Once a suitable malarial patient has been found, it is easy to inoculate many more from him, and the type of malaria which results can be controlled with great facility by means of quinine. An experiment of this sort has been in progress in the Royal Hospital at Morningside under the direction of Prof. George M. Robertson since March, 1922, and the results which have so far accrued are shown in the accompanying table. The method of inoculating the general paralytic and the details of the subsequent treatment need not be recapitulated here, as they are fully dealt with in the issue of the British Medical Journal dated October 20, 1923.

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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2514-9946
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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The Rôle of Infection in the Treatment of General Paralysis

  • W. M. McAlister (a1)
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