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Neuropsychiatric predictors of return to work in HIV/AIDS

  • WILFRED G. VAN GORP (a1), JUDITH G. RABKIN (a1) (a2), STEPHEN J. FERRANDO (a3), JIM MINTZ (a4), ELIZABETH RYAN (a5), THOMAS BORKOWSKI (a2) and MARTIN MCELHINEY (a2)...
Abstract

This study followed 118 HIV+ individuals who had taken steps to return to work to determine facilitators or barriers in returning to work. Over the two-year study period, 52% of the participants obtained employment. Memory function served as the most potent predictor of obtaining employment. Persons who were younger, did not have a diagnosis of AIDS and who had shorter periods of unemployment prior to entering the study also had better chances of finding employment during the study. After finding employment, participants reported lower levels of depression as well, an apparent result of their obtaining employment. These findings indicate that memory is a key neuropsychiatric variable that is perhaps most relevant to HIV+ persons' quest to return to work. (JINS, 2007, 13, 80–89.)

Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Wilfred G. van Gorp, Ph.D., Columbia Presbyterian Eastside, 16 E. 60th St. Suite 400. New York, New York 10022. E-mail: wv2006@columbia.edu
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Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
  • ISSN: 1355-6177
  • EISSN: 1469-7661
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-the-international-neuropsychological-society
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