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Toy Recalls and China: Emotion vs. Evidence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2015

Paul W. Beamish
Affiliation:
University of Western Ontario, Canada
Hari Bapuji
Affiliation:
University of Manitoba, Canada
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Abstract

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Product recalls in 2007 raised serious questions about the safety of products made in China and resulted in widespread outrage. Our analysis of toy recalls in the USA between 1988 and 2007 revealed that the vast majority of recalls were due to flaws in product designs, conducted in the corporate headquarters of toy companies, rather than to poor manufacturing by factories in Asian countries. We also found that the recalls have increased over the years, due both to design and manufacturing flaws. Our findings generated widespread interest and influenced the course of debate on import product safety. Our findings and experiences have significant implications for the research on product quality in international operations and the role that systematic research evidence can play in shaping management practice and public debate.

Type
Editors' Forum – Made in China: Implications of Chinese Product Recalls
Copyright
Copyright © International Association for Chinese Management Research 2008

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