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Mapping Local Surface Plasmon Modes in a Nanoplasmonic Trimer Using Cathodoluminescence in the Scanning Electron Microscope

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2020

Amelia C. Y. Liu
Affiliation:
School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
Julian Lloyd
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
Toon Coenen
Affiliation:
DELMIC BV, Kanaalweg 4, 2628 EB, Delft, The Netherlands
Daniel E. Gómez
Affiliation:
School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The excitability of local surface plasmon modes in radial trimers composed of gold nanorods was mapped using hyperspectral cathodoluminescence (CL) in the scanning electron microscope. In symmetric trimers, the local plasmon resonances could be excited most effectively at the ends of individual rods. Introducing asymmetry into the structure breaks the degeneracy of the dipole modes and changes the excitability of transverse dipole modes in different directions. CL in the scanning electron microscope has great potential to interrogate individual nanophotonic structures and is a complement to electron energy loss spectroscopy and optical microscopy.

Type
Australian Microbeam Analysis Society Special Section AMAS XV 2019
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2020

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Mapping Local Surface Plasmon Modes in a Nanoplasmonic Trimer Using Cathodoluminescence in the Scanning Electron Microscope
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Mapping Local Surface Plasmon Modes in a Nanoplasmonic Trimer Using Cathodoluminescence in the Scanning Electron Microscope
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