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Artemia: A Model Specimen for Educational Microscopy Projects in Biological and Ecological Fields

  • Jörg Piper (a1)
Abstract:

Artemia sp. (brine shrimp) can be used for pedagogic purposes as an instructive model organism to demonstrate the development and maturation of small marine crustaceans within a time window suited to classroom experiments. This article describes some characteristics of Artemia and gives several hints for culturing, light microscopy observations, and photomicrography. The morphological variations and successive differentiation associated with the maturation process are presented through various types of light microscopy images. Increasing differentiations of movement patterns are considered. Moreover, some suggestions of further experiments are reported, which can be used as introductions to fundamental principles of scientific work.

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References
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[1] Abatzopoulos, TJ et al., Artemia, basic and applied biology, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2002.
[2] Dhont, J and Lavens, P, “Tank production and use of ongrown Artemia ” in Manual of the production of live food for aquaculture, FAO Fishers Technical Paper 361 , eds. P Lavens and P Sorgeloos, Rome, 1996.
[3] Ruppert, EE et al., Invertebrate Zoology: A Functional Evolutionary Approach, 7th Edition, Brooks Cole, Pacific Grove, CA, 2003.
[4] Piper, J, Microscopy Today 21(1) (2013) 1016.
[5] Piper, J, Microscopy and Analysis 106 (2007) 58.
[6] Dhont, J et al., “Preparation and use of Artemia as food for shrimp and prawn larvae” in CRC Handbook of Mariculture, 2nd Ed. Vol. 1: Crustacean Culture, ed. JV McVey, CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, FL, 1993, 6193.
[7] Evjemo, JO and Olsen, Y, J Exp Mar Biol Ecol 242(2) (1999) 273296.
[a] General information: Encyclopedia of life (EOL), “Artemia salina, Brine Shrimp.” http://eol.org/pages/1020243/details (accessed April 24, 2018).
[b] C Drewes, “Artemia franciscana (2002).” Zoology & Genetics Dept. Iowa State University. https://www.eeob.iastate.edu/faculty/DrewesC/htdocs/ARTEMIA.PDF (accessed April 24, 2018).
[c] Functional anatomy: RS Fox, “Invertebrate Anatomy Online, Artemia franciscana, Brine Shrimp (2006).” Lander University, Greenwood, SC, 2006. http://lanwebs.lander.edu/faculty/rsfox/invertebrates/artemia.html (accessed April 24, 2018).
[d] Nikon Instruments, “Shade-Off and Halo Phase Contrast Artifacts,” online tutorial. https://www.microscopyu.com/tutorials/shade-off-and-halo-phase-contrast-artifacts (accessed April 24, 2018).
[e] Pedagocial considerations focused on very young children: Brine Shrimp Direct Inc., “Brine shrimp in the classroom.” http://www.brineshrimpdirect.com/c175/c76/brine-shrimp-classroom-c176.html (accessed April 24, 2018).
[f] Suggestions of experimental protocols for advanced users: NLY Sheng, “The effect of temperature on the hatching success of brine shrimps, practical script,” (2011). http://brainstormthoughts147.blogspot.de/2011/03/practical-52-effect-of-temperature-on.html (accessed April 24, 2018).
[g] Young nauplii of Artemia: “Artemia salina,” (2007) video clip. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPURd2qfwEI (accessed April 24, 2018).
[h] Mature Artemia: “Sea Monkeys,” (2008) video clip. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Bx_JimGwM4&spfreload=10 (accessed April 24, 2018).
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Microscopy Today
  • ISSN: 1551-9295
  • EISSN: 2150-3583
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