Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Singapore, 1915, and the Birth of the Asian Underground*

  • TIM HARPER (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

This paper examines the 1915 Singapore Mutiny within the context of border-crossing patriotic and anarchist movements in the early twentieth century world. It traces some of the continuities and discontinuities with later revolutionary movements in Asia, especially in terms of networks and the sites of their interactions. Through this, it reflects on the meaning of the ‘transnational’ at this moment in Asian history.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Singapore, 1915, and the Birth of the Asian Underground*
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Singapore, 1915, and the Birth of the Asian Underground*
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Singapore, 1915, and the Birth of the Asian Underground*
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Footnotes
Hide All
*

An early version of this paper was written for a workshop on ‘Asia Inside Out: Period’ at the University of Hong Kong, December 2010. I am very grateful to the organizers, Helen Siu and Eric Tagliacozzo, for inviting me. I owe a particular debt to Sunil Amrith and all our co-participants at the ‘Sites of Asian Interaction’ project at the Centre for History and Economics, Cambridge.

Footnotes
References
Hide All

1 Thomas Lowell, Lauterbach of the China Sea: the Escapes and Adventures of Seagoing Falstaff (New York: Doubleday, Doran & Company, 1930), p. 114.

2 Letter from unidentified correspondent, Singapore, 24 February 1915, CO 273/420, The National Archives, London (TNA).

3 For the narrative, I have drawn on Tarling Nicholas's essential essay ‘“The Merest Pustule”: The Singapore Mutiny of 1915’, Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 55 (1982), pp. 2659; and Harper R.W.E. and Miller Harry, Singapore Mutiny (Singapore: Oxford in Asia Paperbacks, 1985), especially pp. 120, 133–36.

4 W.G. Maxwell, ‘Narrative’, [24 February 1915], CO 273/420, TNA.

5 Harper and Miller, Singapore Mutiny, pp. 172–90.

6 Letter from unidentified correspondent, Singapore, 4 March 1915, CO 273/420, TNA.

7 Governor, Straits Settlements, to Secretary of State for the Colonies, 25 February 1915, CO 273/420, TNA.

8 Snow Karen A., ‘Russia and the 1915 Indian Mutiny in Singapore’, South East Asia Research 5 (1997), pp. 295315.

9 Tarling, ‘“The Merest Pustule”’, p. 26.

10 Doran Christine, ‘Gender Matters in the Singapore Mutiny’, Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia 17 (1) (2002), pp. 7693.

11 Captain Winsley T.M., A History of the Singapore Volunteer Corps, 1854–1937, Being Also an Historical Outline of Volunteering in Malaya (Singapore: Government Printing Office, 1938), p. 64.

12 ‘Court of Inquiry’, enclosed in Governor, Straits Settlements, to Secretary of State for the Colonies, 19 August 1915, CO 273/423, TNA.

13 Harper and Miller, Singapore Mutiny, pp. 195–204.

14 The best account of the post mortem is Tarling, ‘“The Merest Pustule”’.

15 Sareen T.R., Secret Documents on the Singapore Mutiny 1915 (New Delhi: Mounto Publishing House, 1985), pp. 120.

16 Choon Ban Kah, Absent History: The Untold Story of Special Branch Operations in Singapore 1915–1942 (Singapore: Horizon Books, 2001).

17 Important exceptions include Tarling Nicholas, The Fall of Imperial Britain in Southeast Asia (Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1993); Guoqi Xu, China and the Great War: China's Pursuit of a New National Identity and Internationalization (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005); and van Dijk Kees, The Netherlands Indies and the Great War, 1914–1918 (Leiden: KITLV, 2007). For the global turn, see, for example, Strachan Hew, The First World War, Volume One: To Arms (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003).

18 Mrázek Rudolf, Engineers of Happy Land: Technology and Nationalism in a Colony (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), p. v.

19 Reynolds Michael A., Shattering Empires: The Clash and Collapse of the Ottoman and Russian Empires 1908–1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

20 Kuwajima Sho, Indian Mutiny in Singapore, 1915 (Calcutta: Ratna Prakashan, 1991).

21 Guoqi Xu, Strangers on the Western Front: Chinese Workers in the Great War (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2011).

22 Baker C., ‘Economic Reorganization and the Slump in South and Southeast Asia’, Comparative Studies in Society and History 23 (3) (1981), pp. 325–49.

23 Young to Bonar Law, 25 August 1916, GD/C/21, Singapore National Archives (SNA).

24 This is a major theme of Van Dijk, The Netherlands Indies and the Great War. For the ‘age of strikes’, see Ingleson John, In Search of Justice: Workers and Unions in Colonial Java, 1908–1926 (Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1986); and Shiraishi Takashi, An Age in Motion: Popular Radicalism in Java, 1912–1926 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1990). For a summary of the general unrest, see Vickers Adrian, A History of Modern Indonesia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), p. 46.

25 R.J. Wilkinson to Andrew Bonar Law, 22 November 1915, GD/C/20, SNA.

26 Choudhury Deep Kanta Lahiri, Telegraphic Imperialism: Crisis and Panic in the Indian Empire, c.1830–1920 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

27 Robinson Francis, ‘The British Empire and the Muslim World’, in Louis William Roger and Brown Judith (eds), The Oxford History of the British Empire (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), Vol. 4, pp. 398420; Bennison Amira K., ‘Muslim Universalism and Western Globalization’, in Hopkins A.G. (ed.), Globalization in World History (New York: W.W. Norton & Co, 2002), pp. 7394.

28 Andaya Barbara Watson, ‘From Rūm to Tokyo: The Search for Anticolonial Allies by the Rulers of Riau, 1899–1914’, Indonesia 24 (1977), pp. 123–56; Laffan Michael Francis, Islamic Nationhood and Colonial Indonesia: The Umma Below the Winds (London: Routledge, 2003); Hussin Iza, ‘The Making of Islamic Law: Local Elites and Colonial Authority in British Malaya’, in Dubois Thomas (ed.), Casting Faiths: Technology and the Creation of Religion in East and Southeast Asia (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), pp. 155–74.

29 Hevia James L., The Imperial Security State: British Colonial Knowledge and Empire-building in Asia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012); Tagliacozzo Eric, ‘Kettle on a Slow Boil: Batavia's Threat Perceptions in the Indies’ Outer Islands, 1870–1910’, Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 31 (1) (2000), pp. 70100.

30 Abbott G.P., ‘A Revolt of Islam?’, Quarterly Review 223 (1915), p. 69.

31 Landau Jacob M., The Politics of Pan-Islam: Ideology and Organization (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994). There is a large literature on the Hadrami, but for this period, see especially Mobini-Kesheh Natalie, The Hadrami Awakening: Community and Identity in the Netherlands East Indies, 1900–1942 (Ithaca, New York: SEAP Publications, 1999).

32 See especially the insightful essay by van Dijk Kees, ‘Religion and the Undermining of British Rule in South and Southeast Asia During the Great War’, in Feener R. Michael and Feener Terenjit Sevea (eds), Islamic Connections: Muslim Societies in South and Southeast Asia (Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2009), pp. 109–33.

33 Sareen, Secret Documents, p. 730.

34 Major-General Dudley Ridout, ‘Reference to Report signed by General Houghton on 11 May 1915, marked “X”’, CO 273/423, TNA.

35 Sareen, Secret Documents, pp. 616–17, and as discussed by Van Dijk, ‘Religion and the Undermining of British Rule’, pp. 125–26.

36 Malaya Tribune, 9 March 1915.

37 Ho Engseng, ‘Empire Through Diasporic Eyes: A View from the Other Boat’, Comparative Studies in Society and History 46 (2) (2004), p. 212.

38 Allen J. de V., ‘The Kelantan Rising of 1915: Some Thoughts on the Concept of Resistance in British Malayan History’, Journal of Southeast Asian History 9 (2) (1968), pp. 241–57. Kheng Cheah Boon, To’ Janggut: Legends, Histories, and Perceptions of the 1915 Rebellion in Kelantan (Singapore: NUS Press, 2006); Ban, Absent History, pp. 47–53.

39 The classic account is Johnston Hugh J. M., The Voyage of the ‘Komagata Maru’: The Sikh Challenge to Canada's Colour Bar (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1979).

40 Singh Waraich Malwinderjit and Singh Sidhu Gurdev (eds), Komagata Maru: A Challenge to Colonialism: Key Documents (Chandigarh: Unistar, 2005), p. 104.

41 Governor, Straits Settlements, to Secretary of State for the Colonies, 19 August 1915, CO 273/423, TNA.

42 Lieutenant Colonel G.H.B. Lees, ‘Short History of the Malay States Guides from 16 March 1914 to date’, GD/C/20, SNA.

43 Telegram from Governor, Straits Settlements, to Secretary of State for the Colonies, 24 July 1915, CO 273/423, TNA.

44 McCann Gerard, ‘Sikhs and the City: Sikh History and Diasporic Practice in Singapore’, Modern Asian Studies 45 (6) (2011), pp. 1465–498.

45 Commandant Malay States Guides to DAAG Aden Brigade, 10 December 1916, in Young to Walter Long, 17 October 1918, GD/C/24, SNA.

46 Ramnath Maia, Haj to Utopia: How the Ghadar Movement Charted Global Radicalism and Attempted to Overthrow the British Empire (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011).

47 ‘Memorandum’ enclosed in W.A.D. Beckett to General Secretary Buitenzorg, 29 June 1915, Kol. Openbaar Vb 20-8-1915/35, Nationaal Archief, Den Haag (ANA).

48 Ramnath, Haj to Utopia, p. 51.

49 Ban, Absent History, p. 29.

50 There is a large literature on this: key accounts include Fraser T.G., ‘Germany and Indian Revolution, 1914–18’, Journal of Contemporary History 12 (2) (1977), pp. 255–72; Dignan Don, The Indian Revolutionary Problem in British Diplomacy, 1914–1919 (New Delhi: Allied Publishers, 1983); Bose A.C., Indian Revolutionaries Abroad, 1905–1927: Select Documents (New Delhi: Northern Book Centre, 2002), and, more recently, Ramnath, Haj to Utopia, and Van Dijk, The Netherlands Indies and the Great War, pp. 317–52.

51 Goscha Christopher E., Thailand and the Southeast Asian Networks of the Vietnamese Revolution, 1885–1954 (London: Curzon, 1998), pp. 4344.

52 Consul, Saigon, to Secretary of State, 21 April 1915, COD/C/60, SNA.

53 Frost Mark Ravinder, ‘Asia's Maritime Networks and the Colonial Public Sphere, 1840–1920’, New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies 6 (2004), pp. 6394.

54 Lucas Sir Charles (ed.), The Empire at War (London: Oxford University Press, 1926), Vol. 5, pp. 398401.

55 Discussed in Harper T.N., ‘Globalism and the Pursuit of Authenticity: The Making of a Diasporic Public Sphere in Singapore’, Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia 12 (2) (1997), pp. 261–92.

56 Kuwajima, Indian Mutiny, p. 144.

57 Secret Appendix to War Diary of the General Staff, Straits Settlements Command, for September 1919: ‘Suspected Persons’, FO 371/3816, TNA.

58 Kuwajima, Indian Mutiny, pp. 90–103, 117–18.

59 For example, Anderson Benedict, Under Three Flags: Anarchism and the Anti-Colonial Imagination (London: Verso, 2005); Hau Caroline S. and Tejapira Kasian (eds), Traveling Nation-makers: Transnational Flows and Movements in the Making of Modern Southeast Asia (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2011).

60 By Will Allen S., World-crisis in China (Baltimore: J. Murphy Co., 1900), and see Bickers Robert and Tiedemann R. G. (eds), The Boxers, China, and the World (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007).

61 Kurzman Charles, Democracy Denied, 1905–1915: Intellectuals and the Fate of Democracy (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2008), especially p. 3.

62 Stovall Tyler, ‘The Color Line Behind the Lines: Racial Violence in France During the Great War’, The American Historical Review 103 (3) (1998), pp. 737–69; Xu, Strangers on the Western Front; Levine Marilyn A., The Found Generation : Chinese Communists in Europe During the Twenties (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1993).

63 Duara Prasenjit, ‘The Discourse of Civilization and Pan-Asianism’, Journal of World History 12 (2001), pp. 99130; Adas Michael, ‘Contested Hegemony: The Great War and the Afro-Asian Assault on the Civilizing Mission Ideology’, Journal of World History 15 (2004), pp. 3163.

64 Malaka Tan, From Jail to Jail. Translated, edited and introduced by Jarvis Helen. 3 volumes (Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1991), Vol. I, p. 26.

65 As discussed in Ramnath, Haj to Utopia, p. 4.

66 Mark Emmanuel, ‘Trading with the Enemy: Economic Warfare against Germany in the Straits Settlements, 1914–1921’, BA (Hons) Academic Exercise, National University of Singapore, 1996, p. 15.

67 Harper Tim, ‘The British “Malayans”’, in Bickers Robert (ed.), Settlers and Expatriates: Britons over the Seas (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), pp. 233–68.

68 Ghee Lim Teck, Peasants and Their Agricultural Economy in Colonial Malaya, 1874–1941 (Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press 1977); Wah Yeo Kim, The Politics of Decentralization: Colonial Controversy in Malaya, 1920–1929 (Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, 1982).

69 Torpey John, The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship and the State (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999); McKeown Adam, Melancholy Order: Asian Migration and the Globalization of Borders (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008).

70 Tagliacozzo Eric, Secret Trades, Porous Borders: Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Frontier, 1865–1915 (New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 2005).

71 Breman Jan and Daniel E. Valentine, ‘Conclusion: The Making of a Coolie’, Journal of Peasant Studies 19 (3–4) (1992), pp. 268–95.

72 ‘List of persons deported under orders of banishment during the month of December 1914’, CO 273/420, TNA; HC Deb 25 February 1914 vol. 58 cc1749–50.

73 Yong C.F. and McKenna R.B., Kuomintang Movement in British Malaya, 1912–1949 (Singapore: NUS Press, 1990), p. 67; Alun Jones, ‘Internal Security in British Malaya, 1895–1942’, PhD thesis, Yale University, 1970, p. 129.

74 Jensen Joan M., ‘The “Hindu Conspiracy”: A Reassessment’, Pacific Historical Review 48 (1) (1979), pp. 6583.

75 Sayre Francis B., ‘Criminal Conspiracy’, Harvard Law Review 35 (4) (1922), p. 406.

76 MacMunn G.F., The Underworld of India (London: Jarrolds, 1933), p. 13.

77 Popplewell Richard, Intelligence and Imperial Defence: British Intelligence and the Defence of the Indian Empire, 1904–1924 (London: Routledge, 1995).

78 Foster Anne L., Projections of Power: The United States and Europe in Colonial Southeast Asia, 1919–1941 (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010), pp. 1522.

79 Poeze Harry, ‘Political intelligence in the Netherlands Indies’, in Cribb Robert (ed.), The Late Colonial State in Indonesia: Political and Economic Foundations of the Netherlands Indies 1880–1942 (Leiden: KITLV Press, 1994), pp. 229–45; Van Dijk, The Netherlands East Indies and the Great War, pp. 322–29.

80 Goscha, Thailand and the Southeast Asian Networks, pp. 40–43; Porch Douglas, The French Secret Services: From the Dreyfus Affair to the Gulf War (London: Macmillan, 1996), pp. 293–94.

81 Munholland J. Kim, ‘The French Response to the Vietnamese Nationalist Movement, 1905–14’, The Journal of Modern History 47 (4) (1975), p. 674.

82 Ramnath, Haj to Utopia, p. 2.

83 Letter from Agents, BISN Singapore, to Controller of Labour, FMS, 4 October 1915, Singapore, BIS/7/20, National Maritime Museum. I am grateful to Sunil Amrith for this reference.

84 McKeown Adam, ‘Global Migration, 1846–1940’, Journal of World History 15 (2) (2004), pp. 176–77.

85 See the splendid study by Khuri-Makdisi Ilham, The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860–1914 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010).

86 Hanley Will, ‘Grieving Cosmopolitanism in Middle East Studies’, History Compass 6 (5) (2008), pp. 1346–367.

87 See Bose Sugata, A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2006), Manjapra Bose and Kris, Cosmopolitan Thought Zones: South Asia and the Global Circulation of Ideas(London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010); Aydin Cemil, The Politics of Anti-westernism in Asia: Visions of World Order in Pan-Islamic and Pan-Asian Thought (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007).

88 See especially Lewis Su Lin, ‘Cosmopolitanism and the Modern Girl: A Cross-Cultural Discourse in 1930s Penang’, Modern Asian Studies 43 (6) (2008), pp. 135.

89 Goscha, Thailand and the Southeast Asian Networks, pp. 34–40. This is a pioneering study, to which I am greatly indebted.

90 Ho, ‘Empire through Diasporic Eyes’; Goscha, Thailand and the Southeast Asian Networks, p. 5.

91 Harper T.N., ‘Empire, Diaspora and the Languages of Globalism, 1850–1914’, in Hopkins A.G. (ed.), Globalization in World History (London: Pimlico, 2001), pp. 141–66.

92 Amrith Sunil S., ‘Tamil Diasporas across the Bay of Bengal’, American Historical Review, 114 (2009), pp. 547–72.

93 Chattopadhyaya Gautam, Abani Mukherji, a Dauntless Revolutionary and Pioneering Communist (New Delhi: People's Publishing House, 1976), p. 150.

94 van der Veur Paul W., The Lion and the Gadfly: Dutch Colonialism and the Spirit of E.F.E. Douwes Dekker (Leiden: KITLV, 2007).

95 Chattopadhyaya, Abani Mukherji, p. 150.

96 Bose, Indian Revolutionaries, p. 157; Ahmad Muzaffar, Myself and the Communist Party of India, 1920–1929 (Calcutta: National Book Agency, 1970), pp. 199254.

97 Sita Ram, Inspector of Police, ‘Report’, 30 July 1915, Vb 26-11-1915 C14, ANA.

98 Bose, Indian Revolutionaries, p. 158.

99 ‘Maverick: Supplement VI of February 1, 1916’, CO 273/447, TNA.

100 Van Dijk, The Netherlands Indies and the Great War, pp. 330–31.

101 H.J. Vermeer, ‘Eenige opmerkingen omtrent den Japanschen inlichtingsdient in Oost-Azië (verkregen door gesprekken met den Britisch-Indischen banneling A. Selam, te Koepang)’, 22 November 1915, Vb 30–3–1916 D5, ANA.

102 For this kind of itinerary, see the important study by Manjapra Kris, M.N. Roy: Marxism and Colonial Cosmopolitanism (New Delhi: Routledge India, 2010).

103 Epstein A.L., ‘The Network and Urban Social Organization, in Mitchell J. Clyde (ed.), Social Networks in Urban Situations: Analyses of Personal Relationships in Central African Towns (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1969), pp. 77116; Granovetter Mark S., ‘The Strength of Weak Ties’, American Journal of Sociology 78 (6) (1973), pp. 1360–380.

104 Shiraishi, An Age in Motion, p. 193.

105 My understanding of this emerges from a collaborative project with Sunil Amrith; see Amrith S. and Harper T., ‘Sites of Asian Interaction: An Introduction’, Modern Asian Studies 46 (2) (2012), pp. 249–57.

106 ‘He was intimately acquainted with what might be called the limicole world, that of minor or middling officials, who lived with one foot upon the shore and the other on the sea. . .’, Patrick O'Brien, The Letter of Marque (London: HarperCollins, 1988), p. 47.

107 Nelson Bruce, Workers on the Waterfront: Seamen, Longshoremen, and Unionism in the 1930s (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988), p. 10.

108 Ashleigh Charles, ‘The Floater’, International Socialist Review 15 (July 1914), pp. 3438.

109 Fowler Josephine, Japanese and Chinese Immigrant Activists: Organizing in American and International Communist Movements, 1919–1933 (New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 2007).

110 Ghadar, 29 August 1915, translated in ‘Memorandum’, Acting British Consul Manila, 14 October 1915, FO 115/1908, TNA.

111 Kiernan Victor, ‘Modern Capitalism and its Shepherds’, New Left Review 183 (1990), p. 87. A very early sketch of this argument was given at a tribute meeting to the work of Victor Kiernan in Cambridge in October 2010.

112 Ramnath, Haj to Utopia, especially pp. 67–68, 95–122.

113 Shu-mei Shih, The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917–1937 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001), p. 15.

114 Dirlik Arif, Anarchism in the Chinese Revolution (Berkeley: California University Press, 1991); Yong C.F., The Origins of Malayan Communism (Singapore: South Seas Society, 1997); Ramnath Maia, Decolonizing Anarchism: An Antiauthoritarian History of India's Liberation Struggle (Oakland, California: AK Press, 2012).

115 Puri Harish K., ‘Revolutionary Organization: A Study of the Ghadar Movement’, Social Scientist 9 (2/3) (1990), p. 54.

116 Arnold David and DeWald Erich, ‘Everyday Technology in South and Southeast Asia: An Introduction’, Modern Asian Studies 46 (1) (2012), p. 117.

117 Abstracts of Secret Intelligence, Straits Settlements, for July 1920, FO 371/5356, TNA.

118 Giebel Christoph, Imagined Ancestries of Vietnamese Communism Ton Duc Thang and the Politics of History and Memory (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004); Miller Michael B., Shanghai on the Métro: Spies, Intrigue and the French Between the Wars (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994).

119 Hirson Baruch and Vivian Lorraine, Strike Across the Empire: The Seamen's Strike of 1925 in Britain, South Africa and Australasia (London: Clio, 1992).

120 Christopher MacEvitt, The Crusades and the Christian World of the East: Rough Tolerance (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press).

121 Kahn Joel S., Other Malays: Nationalism and Cosmopolitanism in the Modern Malay World (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2006), pp. 158–76.

122 Motoo Firuta, ‘Vietnamese Political Movements in Thailand: Legacy of the Dong-Du Movement’, in Sinh Vinh (ed.), Phan Boi Chau and the Dong-Du movement (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988), p. 150.

123 I am evoking here, of course, Billig Michael, Banal Nationalism (London: SAGE Publications, 1995).

124 Kusno Abidin, ‘From City to City: Tan Malaka, ‘Shanghai and the Politics of Geographical Imagining’, Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 24 (3) (2003), p. 337.

125 Tan Malaka, From Jail to Jail, Vol. II, pp. 102–12.

* An early version of this paper was written for a workshop on ‘Asia Inside Out: Period’ at the University of Hong Kong, December 2010. I am very grateful to the organizers, Helen Siu and Eric Tagliacozzo, for inviting me. I owe a particular debt to Sunil Amrith and all our co-participants at the ‘Sites of Asian Interaction’ project at the Centre for History and Economics, Cambridge.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Modern Asian Studies
  • ISSN: 0026-749X
  • EISSN: 1469-8099
  • URL: /core/journals/modern-asian-studies
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 36
Total number of PDF views: 220 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 609 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 15th December 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.