Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Sharon C. Glotzer to present The Fred Kavli Distinguished Lectureship in Materials Science
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Sharon C. Glotzer to present The Fred Kavli Distinguished Lectureship in Materials Science
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Sharon C. Glotzer to present The Fred Kavli Distinguished Lectureship in Materials Science
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Sharon C. Glotzer, the John W. Cahn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, will give The Fred Kavli Distinguished Lectureship in Materials Science at the 2019 Materials Research Society (MRS) Fall Meeting in Boston.

Glotzer’s current research on computational assembly science and engineering aims toward predictive materials design of colloidal and soft matter. Using computation, geometrical concepts, and statistical mechanics, her research group seeks to understand complex behavior emerging from simple rules and forces, and they use that knowledge to design new materials. Glotzer’s group also develops and disseminates powerful open-source software, including the particle simulation toolkit, HOOMD-blue, which allows for fast molecular simulation of materials on graphics processors, the signac framework for data and workflow management, and several analyses and visualization tools.

Glotzer holds faculty appointments in physics, applied physics, and macromolecular science and engineering. She is also the Anthony C. Lembke Department Chair of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan. She received her BS degree in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her PhD degree in physics from Boston University. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She is a Fellow of MRS, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), the American Physical Society (APS), and the Royal Society of Chemistry. Glotzer is the recipient of the 2019 Aneesur Rahman Prize for Computational Physics from APS, the 2018 Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum and the 2016 Alpha Chi Sigma Awards, both from the AIChE, the 2017 MRS Communications Lecture Award and the 2014 MRS Medal. She is an advocate for simulation-based materials research, including nanotechnology and high-performance computing, serving on boards and advisory committees of the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (National Academies). She is currently a member of the National Academies Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.