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A new electronic assay enables ultrasensitive detection of diverse biological analytes—nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules—on a single integrated circuit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2012

Leyla Soleymani*
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics, School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 4K1, Canada
*
Address all correspondence to Leyla Soleymani atsoleyml@mcmaster.ca
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Abstract

Development of universal biosensors based on electrical readout is currently limited by the difficulty of electrical signal transduction upon capture of neutral analytes. Kelley and co-workers demonstrate an elegant approach wherein an amplified electrical current flows to a multiplexed electrode array in proportion with the binding of nucleic acids, proteins, and small molecules—regardless of their inherent charge. Here we present a commentary on the strengths and limitations of this method.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

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A new electronic assay enables ultrasensitive detection of diverse biological analytes—nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules—on a single integrated circuit
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