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Inorganic Quantum Dot - Organic Dendrimer Nanocomposite Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

K. Sooklal
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, murphy@psc.sc.edu
J. Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, murphy@psc.sc.edu
C. J. Murphy
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, murphy@psc.sc.edu
L. Hanus
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208
H. J. Ploehn
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208
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Abstract

Semiconductor quantum dots are of great current interest for their optical properties. We have developed a method for preparing CdS quantum dots in commercially available PAMAM Starburst dendrimers. The resulting CdS-dendrimer nanocomposites are exceptionally stable and emit brightly in the blue. The size of the dendrimer (its “generation”) has a surprisingly small effect on the optical properties of the resulting nanocomposites. The dot-dendrimer nanocomposites can be captured in a silica sol-gel matrix to yield a stable, bright blue-emitting glass.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

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