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Mocvd-Preparation And In-Situ/Uhvanalysis Of Epitaxial Inp-Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

T. Hannappel
Affiliation:
Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Dep. CD, Glienickerstrasse 100, 14109 Berlin, Germany, hannappel@hmi.de
S. Visbeck
Affiliation:
Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Dep. CD, Glienickerstrasse 100, 14109 Berlin, Germany, hannappel@hmi.de
K. Knorr
Affiliation:
Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Dep. CD, Glienickerstrasse 100, 14109 Berlin, Germany, hannappel@hmi.de Technische Universitdt Berlin, PN 6-1, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany
M. Zorn
Affiliation:
Technische Universitdt Berlin, PN 6-1, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany
F. Willig
Affiliation:
Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Dep. CD, Glienickerstrasse 100, 14109 Berlin, Germany, hannappel@hmi.de
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Abstract

Surface science analysis can be utilized for improving the preparation of hetero-interfaces. Epitaxial InP(100)-films were prepared with TBP (tertiarybutylphosphine) and TMin (trimethylindium) as precursors in a commercial MOCVD apparatus. With a new type of transfer system the sample is shifted from the MOCVD apparatus to a UHV chamber within 20 s. A description of the new transfer system is given. RAS (reflection anisotropy spectroscopy) is carried out in the MOCVD and UHV environments. It shows whether the InP(100) surface corresponds to the (2×1) or (2×4) reconstruction or whether it is oxidized. For the first time contamination-free transfer of the (2×1) reconstructed, P-rich InP(100) surface is achieved.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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